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  #1  
Old 04-22-2007, 11:59 AM
Bigblue17 Bigblue17 is offline
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Grinding Wheel Restoration

Hello all. I hope I have posted this in the correct forum.

I am embarking on a restoration project and I need some expert advice.

The pictures below show a 100+ yr-old grinding wheel rescued from my in-law's farm in rural Nova Scotia. The wheel itself is huge, 24 by 2 1/8 inches but, has some small chips on the grinding surface and edges, and is a bit out-of-round and unlevel. The bearing assemblies are both done-for, pitted and siezed with rust. The hand-crank handle is begging to be restored with a new wooden handle.The fully restored piece would be well-used primarily for rough sharpening chores around the farm.

My project involves building a new wooden frame, installing new bearing assemblies(with freewheel) and wheel supports, and finally re-surfacing the grinding wheel and reassembling. That is where I require some advice......

Where would I take a 175 lb grinding wheel to be "restored"...... a graveyard monument manufacturer, a marble counter-top company.... or, is this a chore that I could do at home with minimal tools?

Note: I live in Cape Breton, Nova Scotia and I'd much rather not have to ship this thing to Indiana or California!!

Thank you in advance for your assistance.
BB

Photos:




Last edited by Bigblue17; 04-22-2007 at 12:04 PM.
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  #2  
Old 04-22-2007, 01:30 PM
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Ray Rogers Ray Rogers is offline
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That is so cool! Honestly, I don't know of any service that does this sort of thing but it seems to me you could easily do it yourself.

On surface grinder - which uses a smaller stone wheel - we use a diamond wheel dresser to resurface the stone. These are nothing more than a piece of small steel rod with an industrial diamond set into one end. The other end mounts in a larger block of steel that acts as a base. The magnetic chuck on a suface grinder holds the base in place while you use the table controls to move the dresser back and forth under the stone wheel, taking off a few thousands at a time. In only a few moments you have a brand new face on the stone.

These dressers are cheap and available from any tool supplier. Your stone doesn't have a moveable table under it so you'd have to rig something for that but in a worse case scenario you couls buy a cross slide table for $100 US and that's less than you'd pay to have someone do the job if you had to ship the stone somewhere.

If no one has a better suggestion that would at least get the job done ...


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Old 04-22-2007, 02:49 PM
jwfilion jwfilion is offline
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BB, if I may, I would suggest asking these guys on the machinists forum. I've gotten many answers to questions here:

http://www.practicalmachinist.com/cg...forum/30.html?

Good luck!


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Old 04-22-2007, 04:40 PM
Bigblue17 Bigblue17 is offline
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Ray -
Quote:
....."diamond wheel dresser to resurface the stone...."
I've seen a couple of those on the web and wasn't sure if that is what I needed. I also understand that to do that job properly I would first need to determine the exact rotational center of the grinding wheel to which point I would then affix bearings, hub, etc. Unfortunately the original center hole (a square actually) has long since been chipped and worn away to the degree where that center-point is no longer apparent. And, with the whole wheel being out of round, the process of determining that center point would be hit or miss at best. Please correct me if I am in error. I'll continue to look at those wheel dressers though.

My hope was that a talented person with the right tool could just push a button and a computerized super-jet of water would cut this thing to perfect dimension.... a weakly held hope indeed.

jwfilion - Thank you for the link. I'll take a look.
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Old 04-22-2007, 06:28 PM
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Ray Rogers Ray Rogers is offline
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Sounds to me like you understand the problem but I don't think it is as big a deal as all that. Not that it would be easy but since you decided to fix up this wheel I figure you're willing to do the work.

The center isn't much of a problem. First thing I'd do is fill that square hole. One way might be to first fill the hole with a big piece of hardwood( you could use steel but it will require more fabricating). If the hole is really square then drawing an X corner to corner will show you where the original center of the wheel was. Drill a big hole with the X as the center and insert a metal sleeve or whatever it takes to use your bearings.

If you can attach some temprary power to the wheel to spin it, then truing it up shouldn't really be much of a problem at all...


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Old 06-29-2013, 06:01 AM
bjscott bjscott is offline
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Old sandstone grinding wheel

I have a very old grinding wheel in its metal casing which I think holds the water -the type that used to be used in school woodwork rooms. I would like to know how to get it back in working order again. Any suggestions? Many thanks Betsy-Jane Scott (B-J)

Last edited by bjscott; 06-29-2013 at 07:43 AM.
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Old 04-06-2015, 05:36 AM
Collin Collin is offline
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Welcome Nik, here in Kansas City we have a metal store called Metal By The Foot and there should be a similar place somewhere in Ohio. I bought 2 pieces of 1 1/2" aluminum 22" long to make additional tooling arms for my KMG. They also had steel, brass and bronze but they were to expensive and too heavy for what I needed. I suggest you just check and call around. There has to be a place that non-commercial users can buy from. Good luck!



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Old 04-07-2015, 10:28 AM
jemoran jemoran is offline
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BB, epoxy a piece of square tubing in the existing square hole. Measure from the flats on the tubing to the OD of the wheel and get the four measurements as even as possible. Now you have a true center, and the OD can be trued as described above.

john
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