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The Newbies Arena Are you new to knife making? Here is all the help you will need.

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  #1  
Old 01-28-2012, 02:35 PM
cedarfluteman cedarfluteman is offline
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logo etching

I put this in the tool section but got no replies so thought I would try it here. Sorry if that was a problem. I'm just trying to find some answers.
I know there is a fluid for stainless steel to make the etch better in stainless. What is the best fluid for carbon steel? Or what do you use with success? I tried the stainless fluid on carbon steel and was not that happy with the outcome. To big of a cloud got between the stencil and the knife making it hard to clean up. What's the answer? What am I doing wrong?
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Old 01-28-2012, 03:33 PM
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Ray Rogers Ray Rogers is offline
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I use the commercial fluids sold for the Etch-O-Matic. There is a fluid for stainless, one for carbon, and even one for black oxidized carbon steel. I buy mine from Sheffields Knife Supply but I would guess other suppliers carry it too. It isn't very expensive and a bottle lasts me for years.

For what it may be worth, this kind of information along with the related pricing is readily available in catalogs from the various knife suppliers. There is usually a lot more information in the paper catalogs than on the websites and it's easier to find and easier to comparison shop. I highly recommend that everyone get a catalog from as many suppliers as possible ....


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Old 01-28-2012, 03:51 PM
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Eli Jensen Eli Jensen is offline
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I use the general purpose solution on carbon steel, that seems to work well. I lightly sand with 400 or 600 grit after the etch to clean up any clouding from the etch or neutralizer. Its a little riskier if you don't use the deep etching attachment but a few quick swipes with even 320 grit is enough to clean up any clouding without ruining a shallow etch.
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Old 01-28-2012, 04:30 PM
DaveL DaveL is offline
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Try Marking Methods in CA they have been around a long time
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Old 01-28-2012, 07:21 PM
cedarfluteman cedarfluteman is offline
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Is there a difference in etchers where some just use one diode to get DC voltage verses the one's that use a bridge rectifier to get the DC voltage? Does the one's that have the full wave rectifier using 4 diodes do a better job or don't that matter?
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Old 01-28-2012, 07:52 PM
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Ray Rogers Ray Rogers is offline
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These etchers use both Ac and Dc current to create the etch, it takes both, and it doesn't matter one bit how they accomplish that. Cheap etchers, homemade etchers, or the most expensive commercial etchers, they all do the same job the same way. The only real difference in any of those etchers (that we can afford) is how much power they have which directly relates to how fast and how deep they can etch. Since even the cheapest and least powerful, namely the Etch-O-Matic, can make a nice dark and deep etch suitable for our logos in under one minute all the potential benefits of larger etchers become a moot point in my estimation.

However, please feel free to waste your money in any way you see fit, no one here will stand in your way. Lord knows I waste enough of mine and no one ever tries to talk me out of it ....


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Last edited by Ray Rogers; 01-28-2012 at 07:54 PM.
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Old 01-28-2012, 08:09 PM
cedarfluteman cedarfluteman is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ray Rogers View Post
These etchers use both Ac and Dc current to create the etch, it takes both, and it doesn't matter one bit how they accomplish that. Cheap etchers, homemade etchers, or the most expensive commercial etchers, they all do the same job the same way. The only real difference in any of those etchers (that we can afford) is how much power they have which directly relates to how fast and how deep they can etch. Since even the cheapest and least powerful, namely the Etch-O-Matic, can make a nice dark and deep etch suitable for our logos in under one minute all the potential benefits of larger etchers become a moot point in my estimation.

However, please feel free to waste your money in any way you see fit, no one here will stand in your way. Lord knows I waste enough of mine and no one ever tries to talk me out of it ....
The reason I ask is because I have a transformer that is adjustable. Variable auto transformer. Adjusts from 0-140 volts 10 amp . But that is just AC. I just wondered about the diode configuration if it made any difference or not.
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Old 01-28-2012, 08:52 PM
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Ray Rogers Ray Rogers is offline
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Lots of configurations I suppose but which one you use doesn't matter as log as you have some DC available when it's done. However, that transformer of yours is way over powered for this job. 25V AC is about the max, the Etch-O-Matic does just fine with 12v AC if memory serves and, of course, the DC is half of that. I don't remember about the amperage but I'm pretty sure it's a fraction of an amp. Anyway, another side effect of using those larger more high powered etchers is that they eat your stencils much faster. Etching logos is one time when less is more ....


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Old 01-29-2012, 06:23 AM
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Don't do it Ray, don't listen to the Sirens, cover your ears man!
(never worked for me either)


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