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Fit & Finish Fit and Finish = the difference in "good art" and "fine art." Join in, as we discuss the fine art of finish and embellishment.

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  #1  
Old 11-08-2009, 11:48 PM
P. Nelson P. Nelson is offline
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Epoxy help

Been a good long time since I've logged on here. The system tells me it was 05/06/06. I found my box with all of my knife making stuff in it and a couple of unfinished knives. Got the bug to finish one of them. I'll try to et some pictures of it tomorrow.

I have a question about gluing the handles in place. This knife does not have a bolster, and I was wondering how to clean up any epoxy that might get on the blade when I glue it.

Thanks.
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  #2  
Old 11-09-2009, 07:36 AM
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Ed Caffrey Ed Caffrey is offline
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Finish out the front on the handle slabs. Put them in place (with the pins/bolts) to get an exact placement of where they will sit, and coat everything you do not want glue to get on, with Petroleum Jelly. Then remove the handle slabs, apply the epoxy to the tang, and put slabs in place. Once the epoxy is cured, even if any of it has gotten onto the blade area, you can use a sharpened brass rod to "pop" the little globs of dried glue off.


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  #3  
Old 11-09-2009, 07:45 AM
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David Broadwell David Broadwell is offline
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I do it a little different than Ed. Even up the front of your scales and finish them. I don't like the petroleum jelly - just too messy. When the epoxy squeezes out of the front, wipe off the excess with a clean paper towel. To remove the residue that's left use plain white vinegar on another paper towel. Vinegar cuts uncured epoxy very well, and isn't harmful to you. Check your knife several times until the epoxy sets in case more oozes out.

I've used vinegar on all kinds of blade steel including carbon damascus without any problems. Hasn't hurt ivory or wood either.

You can use the vinegar to remove any epoxy you get on your hands. Acetone also cuts the epoxy, but it's not safe like vinegar.

David


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Old 11-10-2009, 07:17 AM
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Ed Caffrey Ed Caffrey is offline
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Thats a great idea David! All these years and I never even thought about it! I always wonder, after messing with acetone, and then looking at my hands, just how much damage that stuff is doing to me.

I'm gona have to give that a try!


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Old 11-10-2009, 07:48 AM
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David Broadwell David Broadwell is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ed Caffrey
Thats a great idea David! All these years and I never even thought about it! I always wonder, after messing with acetone, and then looking at my hands, just how much damage that stuff is doing to me.

I'm gona have to give that a try!
You need to worry about your liver more!

I use System 3 marine epoxy. Their tech guy told me years ago about using vinegar. I was reading about fiberglass recently, and the article said to use vinegar to clean up. Vinegar cuts the epoxy well, and unless you leave your carbon or damascus bare and with vinegar pooled on it for a long time you shouldn't have any problem. Plus, it's cheaper, like a buck fifty for a gallon.

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  #6  
Old 11-10-2009, 11:59 AM
ColdIron ColdIron is offline
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Very great tip. Thx.


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  #7  
Old 11-11-2009, 05:30 AM
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Crex Crex is offline
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I do it much the same way Ed does but use Birchwood Casey Stock Wax (liquid/paste) instead of PJ. Lot less messy and doesn't tend to creep up under the slabs by capillary action as PJ will. I check the epoxy periodically as it sets with a tooth pick. When it turns rubbery I just skim it off with a bamboo skewer that I've sharpened to a wedge. Peels right off, no muss, no fuss.
I use the same technique on stick tangs both "through" and "blind" applications. Do a final dry-fit run paint the junctions with wax; dissassemble carefully; glue-up then clean up as in above. Usually tape up the bulk of the handle and just wax the junction areas.
Have not had to use clean up solvents with this method and the wax is just a bonus to the followup waxing when knife is completed.
Ed and everyone else - David is spot on! Acetone does do surface damage to your skin by removing natural oils, but the real damage is to your liver. That is where it goes once it clears your natural oil barriers in your skin. The liver damage is accumulative and non reversible. Acetone also enters your system through vapor via your lungs...so quit sniffing the stuff you "closet junkies"!
I do not know how much exposure it takes to really mess you up, but combined with all the other stuff we mess with on a daily basis, it can't be good at any dose. Yes, I have it in the shop and use it on occasion, but have greatly modified my exposure once I found all this out during a Hazmat training course years back.
I am aware that a lot of sheathmakers and leather workers use it for deglazing leather. I do not reccomend it's use there either.


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  #8  
Old 11-11-2009, 08:32 AM
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Don Robinson Don Robinson is offline
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I've always done it just like David, except that I use denatured alcohol to clean up the squeezed out epoxy. A toothpick sitting on a wad of paper towel makes short work of the squeeze out in front of the handle..

I do the first cleanup about 20 minutes after epoxying, then re-check it for about an hour.
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  #9  
Old 11-11-2009, 11:01 AM
P. Nelson P. Nelson is offline
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Thanks everyone for the info. And for the health warning, Crex.
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  #10  
Old 11-11-2009, 06:05 PM
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I use a Q-tip dipped in methal alcohol and just wipe away excess epoxy. Cleans up really well.
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  #11  
Old 12-02-2009, 07:50 AM
cliff fendley cliff fendley is offline
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I use a paper towel or Q-tip with alcohol but I'm going to try the vinegar after reading David's post.


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  #12  
Old 01-23-2011, 12:31 AM
David A David A is offline
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I put blue painter's tape on everything I don't want epoxy on. The epoxy won't seep under the edges of the tape if you press the edges down carefully. Even if the epoxy cures hard on the tape, it's fast and easy to get the tape off. The blue painter's tape is made to come off easy. I did this for years on tables I built, and it works on blades and other parts of knives, as long as they don't have oil, grease, wax, dirt, or dust on them.
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  #13  
Old 01-23-2011, 10:58 AM
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john smith john smith is offline
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I use Q-tips and finger nail polish remover
This works pretty good, just change your Q-tips often.
Be sure you buy the wife an extra bottle !!!
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  #14  
Old 10-12-2014, 11:07 AM
littletree littletree is offline
 
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epoxy question from newbie

Hi all,
in my infancy on the learning the craft, my question is, has anyone ever used smooth -on ea 40 epoxy?
I bought this for a bow-project some time ago and have used this on the few blades I have made. seems solid, however I wonder about moisture barrier and longevity. any thoughts?
I want to thank you each and every one of you for the wonderful shop tips and information, a great community.
George
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  #15  
Old 10-12-2014, 09:42 PM
Doug Lester Doug Lester is offline
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I find that WD-40 on a Q-tip or paper towel will remove stray epoxy but I'm going to have to give the vinegar a try.

Doug


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