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  #1  
Old 09-27-2003, 07:02 AM
Stephen Galperi Stephen Galperi is offline
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Question Epxoy didn't cure - how to get it off?

I'm making my second blade and I'm begining to understand the concept of a murphy knife.

I'm on my 2nd attempt to exopy the bolsters on using Devcon 2-ton. I don't know if I was drunk, asleep or just in a hurry, but the epoxy didn't cure. It got very very sticky but it never got hard. I've been waiting for 3 days and it hasn't getten any better.

I pryed the bolsters off and I want to clean the mess. The scales are stabilized wood (home done with B-72) and they are on there!

I assume acetone is a bad choice. Does anyone have a suggestion?


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  #2  
Old 09-27-2003, 07:35 AM
Frank J Warner Frank J Warner is offline
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What are the bolsters made of? If metal, go ahead and use acetone. It won't attack the cured epoxy under the scales. If you're nervous about using acetone, try lacquer thinner first.

How are you mixing your 2-ton?

-Frank J Warner


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  #3  
Old 09-27-2003, 07:49 AM
Stephen Galperi Stephen Galperi is offline
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The bolsters are brass. I'm concerned with cleaning the resst of the knive. I don't want to ruin the stabilized wood.

I mix the epoxy on the back of a buisness card with an orange wood stick. My wife gets the sticks for use in her work as a nail tech. I have a huge supply so I use clean ones. I eye-ball measure two blobs.

I've been mixing epoxy that way since I was a teenager in the 70's. This is probably the second or third time it hasn't worked in over 20 years.

Murphy is just helping me down the learning curve.

I'll hit the knife with some thinner first, then I'll get more radical. I'll just toss the bolsters on a cup of acetone.


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Old 09-27-2003, 10:11 AM
cactusforge cactusforge is offline
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White vinegar will clean up epoxy. Gib


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Old 09-27-2003, 09:43 PM
Stephen Galperi Stephen Galperi is offline
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I started with thiner, but wound up using acetone and an acid brush.

I reglued it tonight and the epoxy worked just fine. Same tubes of epoxy. Go figure.

Thanks


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Old 09-28-2003, 08:29 AM
Frank J Warner Frank J Warner is offline
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I've been mixing epoxy at least as long as you have. Once or twice over the years I've goofed (when I've been distracted or interrupted) and squeezed two blobs of epoxy from the same tube.

I stick mainly with the 5-minute epoxy these days. There's virtually nothing that I glue that needs an hour or two to set up. If I see no gelling or hardening after three minutes or so, I take it apart and clean everything up, then remix a batch.

I've heard, although not experienced this, that very old epoxy will not cure properly. Basically, if I can't remember when or where I bought it, I test a batch before actually gluing something with it.

-Frank J Warner


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  #7  
Old 09-28-2003, 11:52 AM
Stephen Galperi Stephen Galperi is offline
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I probably shouldn't admit this here, in front of God and the rest of the world, but I probably put out two blobs of resin - no hardner.

Is the 2 ton really any stronger than the 5 minute epoxy?

Anyway, I'm moving forward on the knife again. Maybe this one will be good enough to post a picture of. It has certanly given me enough trouble


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Old 09-28-2003, 12:06 PM
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Mike Hull Mike Hull is offline
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Quote:
Originally posted by Stephen Galperi
IIs the 2 ton really any stronger than the 5 minute epoxy?


Yes it is. It has a lot more tensile strength, and is much more waterproof.

Bob Loveless wrote up some findings on the two types years ago, that's why he uses 2Ton.


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Old 09-29-2003, 07:38 AM
Frank J Warner Frank J Warner is offline
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Quote:
Originally posted by Stephen Galperi
Is the 2 ton really any stronger than the 5 minute epoxy?
Not much if any. The main advantage to 2-ton is the slow set-up time, for large and/or complicated projects. I do woodworking also, and there are many occasions where it takes longer than five minutes to clamp everything together -- that's when the slow-set 2-ton comes in handy.

-FJW


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Old 09-29-2003, 07:41 AM
Frank J Warner Frank J Warner is offline
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I posted the above before I saw Mike Hull's reply. For the things I glue, I can't tell the difference between 2-ton and 5-minute, but I'd like to see the results of Bob Loveless' experiments. Do you know where I can find them?

-FJW


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  #11  
Old 09-29-2003, 11:46 AM
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Mike Hull Mike Hull is offline
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I don't remember the publication, but give him a call. I'm sure he would explain it for you.
909/689-7800


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Old 09-29-2003, 03:47 PM
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Terry Primos Terry Primos is offline
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The 2-Ton has a stronger bond and higher shear and tensile strength I believe. I think it is also more water resistant.

When you first use either the 5 Minute or the 2-Ton, I don't suppose you can really tell much of a difference. I believe that it's down the road where the difference counts.


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  #13  
Old 10-01-2003, 02:34 PM
Davis Davis is offline
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Epoxy-related issue; DevCon 2-ton.

Knife's fine, I made a mess of the applewood handle.
How to get the handle slabs off? ...don't care about ruining the wood, I've already done that... Soak in acetone and beat the (copper) pins out?

yes, boys & girls, you can use too much epoxy

Trish
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Old 10-01-2003, 02:56 PM
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Ray Rogers Ray Rogers is offline
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Trish,

That's one way. I'd probably grind away as much of the wood and glue as I could before I used the acetone. Depending on the glue, the heat of the grinding might help it separate from the metal and the pins will be shorter and easier to remove (hopefully). If it's real stubborn you can drill the pins out......


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Old 10-01-2003, 03:54 PM
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Mike Hull Mike Hull is offline
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Quote:
Originally posted by Davis
Epoxy-related issue; DevCon 2-ton.

Knife's fine, I made a mess of the applewood handle.
How to get the handle slabs off? ...don't care about ruining the wood, I've already done that... Soak in acetone and beat the (copper) pins out?

yes, boys & girls, you can use too much epoxy

Trish

Put the knife in an oven @ 250 degrees for an hour or so. They can be popped right off.

Don't epoxy finished handle slabs. Assemble the knife with bare slabs, and finish the handle after the epoxy is dry.

I guess that's what you are referring to anyway.:confused:


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