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  #1  
Old 10-09-2015, 01:16 PM
dtec1 dtec1 is offline
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High temp Paint on forge body

hey guys i asked this question in a older thread with no answer i think maybe no one following that thread so......In the process of moving the location of the burner on the forge body there were spots where i had to weld a plate over old hole and grinded down the area to put new tube that holds burner in place i had grinded down alot of spots for this so since it was so much i figured i am better off just grinding it everywhere to take paint off and re paint it. I found some high temp paint but i didn't realize till i got home that after it dries it has to be cured. The instructions say to bake it in a oven at 350 degrees for 30 mins then let it cool for 30 mins then repeat that for 400 degrees and 500 degrees. Now i do not have a oven to put it in (with out dealing with some serious BS for a while, not worth it) Has any one out there done this. Is there another way to cure it ? You think maybe running the forge in short intervals like when you apply coatings to the inside of the forge? It doesnt have to be perfect at all i just want it to stand up to the heat (wich cant be all that high being on the outside of the forge, body, handle,feet) and i just want it to protect from rust and stuff like that. That is the main reason for re painting it. I might have a option, my friend said he thinking about it but maybe he will let me do it in his oven (he lives by himself so no one to yell at him) But i did read some where that its not sugested to do in a oven that you would also cook in. But it didnt say why so i dont want to poisin this guys some how. Any one know why? This might not be a option anyway i dont know yet. Any one that has done this or has knoledge on this topic i would really appreciate and advice or tips. As i said it dont have to be perfect just withstand heat on outide of body and protect from rust and stuff like that. THANKS
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  #2  
Old 10-09-2015, 02:29 PM
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Ray Rogers Ray Rogers is offline
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Wow, how do you keep doing this to yourself? I did answer that question in your other thread. Basically, the answer is this: use paint that is intended for painting wood stoves. Oddly enough this is called 'stove paint' . I don't remember where you live (fill out your profile) but if you live in an area where wood stoves are used then the local hardware store should have this paint. Its in a spray can, comes in several colors although black is by far the most popular. Stove paint is rated to 1200 F, you spray it on and forget about it. It will cure when you run the stove (or forge). I generally repaint every year, just spray over the old paint and it blends perfectly.

Whatever that stuff is you have seems to be for coating tools and it probably won't last long on a forge. Not that it matters what the forge looks like. The paint helps keep it from oxidizing too badly and too fast from the heat and it can get ugly doing that...


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Old 10-09-2015, 03:31 PM
dtec1 dtec1 is offline
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Thanks ray....but you (or any one else) deffinitly did not answer this question when i posted it in the older thread i made titled burner angle/ position (wich is the only other place i asked) go check after reading this post i went back and double checked just in case i missed it...nothing. Do you really think i would ask the same exact question if you had answered it...you seem very reliable and to know what your talking about if you had said something i would of gone and tried it and i am sure it would of turned out good just like any other advice you've given. Any way i actually did look for the stove paint couldnt find it anywhere. maybe ill try and look to see if i can order online some where. The stuff i got is actuly what they make to paint engines on cars (intake headers, exaust ect..) its all i could get on hand quick. I know i did tell you that i moved the burner position (remember the post that i put a couple drawings up). well i did all that and when i got the new burner i was excited to play with it wich i did for about a day and half and with in that amount of time the 2 spots that i had grinded down to move burner had no paint and developed rust very quickly in that day and a half. I didnt want to wait to order it by then it would have been real bad. so i got what i could i guess it will have to work for now and ill order this stove paint.
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  #4  
Old 10-09-2015, 03:47 PM
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That's OK, you just missed it is all, you already had the paint you bought anyway. Here's my post:
http://www.knifenetwork.com/forum/sh...856#post481856

Engines get very hot so that paint should do for a while. I wouldn't worry about baking it in an oven though, I doubt many backyard mechanics can bake their engines in an oven. The paint should say on the can somewhere what temperature it will withstand but I'm guessing it will be far short of 1200 F but as long as the fire stays inside the forge you'll get by ...

PS

I just googled VHT paint, looks like good stuff. Some of their products seem to quit at 520F but their header paint is rated to 2000F ! So, depending on which one you have you could be sitting pretty, paint wise ....


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Last edited by Ray Rogers; 10-09-2015 at 03:51 PM.
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Old 10-09-2015, 04:34 PM
dtec1 dtec1 is offline
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ok my bad i did miss it ya know what i did is just hit the refresh button and didnt see any post's under mine i didnt realise your post was the first on a new page (3) i dint even think about the next page sorry...Yeh what i have is the 2000 degree. they had a hole buch of different kinds with different degrees so i figured get the highest i can wich was the 2000 degree. i doubt the outside of my forge will get any where near 2000 but i thought duration of temp might start to play in so ill see how it works. i just didnt want to see it melt off or some other catastrophic fail from not curing in a oven
again my bad sorry about the post
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Old 10-09-2015, 05:47 PM
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I would expect that paint to be fine, it will cure right where it is. The 1200 degree stove paint survives most of the time so that paint seems like it would do even better. I have measured the temp on the skin of my forge and found it can reach 1000 F after hours of running around 2400 F or so. That will bake the paint off after a while but, like I said, repainting once a year works for me.

You'll know if the skin of your forge reaches 2000F because the bright yellow glow will be a clue. Seriously, that won't happen but I expect the paint to bake off over time anyway, just not anytime soon . That's something new for my toolbox, let us know how it holds up ...


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Old 10-09-2015, 06:30 PM
dtec1 dtec1 is offline
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WOW i knew the outside can get hot but i didnt think it could get anywhere near 1000 degrees i know yours is alot bigger than mine but still wouldnt of guessed that
i will deffinitly let ya know i think your right tho about curing as the forge runs cause i did a second layer of satinite (just a patch as i had a hole where the old burner position) so i gota finish patching that up but as i was doing the on then off and slowly turning up thing to finish drying the satinite. The paint seemed to go from dry back to wet (at least that what it looked like i wasnt going to touch it and find out) then it gave off a lil bit of smoke and seemed to go back to dry and it is a flat paint but before it looked a lil glossy (not much) as it seemed to dry again with the forge on the gloss went away and went to straight flat. the only spot i had a lil bit of a problem was on the tube that holds the burner. the new tube is kinda thin and i dint have any wool stuffed in there at first so i guess as the flare heated up it heated the thin tube and a small spot right above the burner started giving off alot more smoke (the rest was very little just enough to notice here and there) and a spot on the paint burned but as soon as i stoped and put some wool in there well that solved the problem. figured ill let it cool over night again before i mess whit it any more. but i will let ya know how it holds up after a lil work and a lil time.
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Old 10-10-2015, 03:23 PM
dtec1 dtec1 is offline
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hey ray (or anyone that might have the answer)
was it you that told me once that when applying satinite (and other coatings) you could either do what instructions say and let it dry completely over night before firering the forge in increasing intervals OR you could fire the forge pritty soon after without waiting hours or overnight if i remember that correctly you had said if you dont wait and you fire it, it might get some cracks in it right? is there any other "side effects" besides cracking? just asking cause i already had layer of satinite and itc100 and buble alumina and i decided insted of just coating those 2 holes from the movement of burner position to just do one layer everywhere so i am thinking about just firering it soon so maybe i can get the bubble alumina or itc back on today to and let that sit over night. i dont care that much about a crack or 2 in that layer since there is a layer underneath and itc or buble alumina will go on top anyway. The thing i dont want to happen is getting moisture on one layer and then another coating on top i have heard people say the layers can actually have a mini explosion and that i do NOT need as long as that dont happen and it doesnt effect quality i am good. sorry if it wasnt you that had told me this some one did and cant remember
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Old 10-10-2015, 04:30 PM
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Yes, it can be done either way but a lot depends on how its done. If you paint it on thin like latex paint you can probably heat it right away - might crack some but probably that's all. But, if you trowel it on thick then you are likely to have enough trapped water to cause it to pop and blow chunks out of the Satanite layer....


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Old 10-10-2015, 05:01 PM
dtec1 dtec1 is offline
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alright thanks again ray goinng to finish doin it now then it has been sitting for alil while i just check on it and most o f it feels decently dry to the touch and i didnt put it on thick so ill go try
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Old 10-10-2015, 05:26 PM
dtec1 dtec1 is offline
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Does the same apply for other coatings specificly itc100 and buble allumina?
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Old 10-10-2015, 05:32 PM
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It would apply to anything with a water component that was put on thick......


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Old 10-10-2015, 07:48 PM
dtec1 dtec1 is offline
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So yeh fired it no problems it did make a couple cracks but not bad just barley hairline and you could miss it if you werent looking for it . I also put some itc 100 on that i am going to wait till tomorow before i fire. Then i gota put the buble alumina pieces back togathe (well what i can,ill see how that turns out)

so ray on your video i know you used many different blowers for the blown burners, if i remember right you had said you need at least 65CFM (or maybe you told me that here) I am not planning on building one anytime real soon. but i do want one in the future so i have been basicly keepin my eyes open for parts. every once in a while i check ebay for a few things and one of those things is a blower fan. I just came across one that is cheaper than i have seen before (squirrel cage type.....i have seen "duct" fans over 65cfm but wasnt sure you can use that type) the one i am talking about is here
http://www.ebay.com/itm/DAYTON-Blowe...item48846bf991
the cfm is 104 volt 114....the only reason i am even thinking about grabing one is the price 16 plus 12 for shiping so 28 total all the over ones i see are like 55 and up. as i said i dont even have all parts and not anywhere near readdy to jump that line to blower burner yet but what would you think is it worth jumpin on for the price or will i probily see another come around with similar price. sorry i know i had alot of questions today but i dont want to loose the fan to some one else if it is a real good deal and it will work good
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Old 10-10-2015, 08:17 PM
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Ray Rogers Ray Rogers is offline
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What I said in the video was that a blower should have 32 to 40 ounces of static pressure. If it has that then 160cfm is probably more than you will ever use but if it doesn't have that much pressure then even 400 cfm is not good enough.

The motor in your listing does specify a static pressure rating - which is rare - but, unfortunately, its rating is in inches. As far as I can tell, that motor isn't likely to work very well or very long as a forge blower. 1/40hp just isn't going to provide much push.

You need a motor designed to push air hard like a mattress inflator (big one like used in a bounce house), a vacuum cleaner (very noisy), or something similar. Or, build your own like I did in the video. Most of those little fans like the one in the auction are designed to move a lot of air only when there is no resistance to the movement. What you need is a motor that can force a lot of air into a small pipe ....


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Old 10-13-2015, 01:08 PM
dtec1 dtec1 is offline
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OK so...my forge deffinitly told me something today i dont know if you remember that i took a hard fire brick and grinded it down to make it thiner and fit in the forge better well a little while ago the fire brick cracked right down the center. I could grind down another brick but it took a while and alot of work for something that might break every few fireings. I got to thinking would it work if i put "rutland refractory cement" on the floor in place of the brick. or would getting some castable be better? the guy in the store told me they are basicly the same thing except the form they come in but lets just say this guy has not always been acurate in other situations. so what do you guys think
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