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The Newbies Arena Are you new to knife making? Here is all the help you will need.

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  #1  
Old 09-23-2015, 07:28 PM
dtec1 dtec1 is offline
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bubble alumina

hey guys i had asked in another thread about this stuff being able to stick to the walls got a good answer from ray how ever i ran into another problem and wanted to see if any one else has had the same problem or any one with some advice. i drew a diagram FIG.1 was what i was planing to do but after all the other layers i went to put in a thin firebrick as the floor to mark out where to put the bubble alumina and now that the chamber has narrowed the brick sits to high. the burner in my forge sits on the side (not up on the top at a tangent as it should) yeh i guess i could move it but that would require alot of work as everything is 1/4 in steel (project for another time) even if i sliced a lil off the sides still to high and they are the hard "split brick" firebrick that are only a lil over a inch thick i think 1 1/4in. the best would be if i could thin them out even more but i dont know how to go about that my ban saw is broke the table saw blade isnt tall enough tried putting on a belt and disk sander and i would be sanding for weeks to thin it out. tried a angle grinder but i dont have masonry grind wheels i tried metal grind wheel didnt do anything (ill try and pick up a masonry one tomorow maybe). the only other thing i could think of is if i turned the brick flat and not on its side so the table saw blade would reach through and cut off little 1/4 in (around) slices and do what is pictured in FIG.2. and embed them into the top of the bubble alumina. however even if i stacked them tightly next to each other there would still be cracks where they meet going down to the bubble alumina and eventuly other coatings and i dont know how long the bubble layer would last with so much flux seeping through the cracks. no point in doing that if it will only last a couple sessions in that case i need a better way. ANY one with any advice on this wether you think "FIG2" would work or not or any other optiopns i havent thought of would be greatly appreciated THANKS

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Old 09-23-2015, 09:57 PM
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Ray Rogers Ray Rogers is offline
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First of all, don't try cutting a brick with your band saw - they make special masonry saws for that because you will ruin any other saw or at least a blade trying to cut brick.

Second, I don't know how accurate your picture is but it looks like you're putting the brick across the forge - put it lengthwise in the forge. If you put one brick lengthwise in the bottom of the forge that's probably all you will need. If you need more length then break another brick and use the piece to add length. Bring the wool to the edge of the brick - which might mean adding some wool strips - and cover the brick and the wool with alumina. That's about as good as it will get ....


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Old 09-24-2015, 06:35 AM
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Crex Crex is offline
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Masonary disc in your side grinder will get it done fast - don't breath in all that dust not good.

Would suggest you try to bank that bubble alumina up both sides and at the doors. It will puddle up for the most part but will flow with gravity like lava. Sooner or later it will find a spot to reach your insulation and melt/dissolve it quite rapidly. A little banking goes a long way.

However, since it sounds like you are bent on welding up damascus in your forge, you better go ahead and figure on moving your torch position. A direct torch blast on your stack of material will greatly increase the oxidation issues you are trying to avoid by using flux. It will just compound the frustration factor for a beginner weld project. Pretty much spitting into the wind.


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Old 09-24-2015, 11:04 AM
damon damon is offline
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one thin brick option....

http://www.riogrande.com/Product/Sil...s/502004?Pos=7

edited to add... these blocks get used for fabricating and soldering/fusing platinum. (that's what I have mine for) so the lower temps of forging steel should be ok.

Last edited by damon; 09-24-2015 at 11:12 AM.
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Old 09-24-2015, 11:46 AM
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That should work, at least for a while. That says its good for 2000F and that probably won't be enough once you get a real burner in that forge .......


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Old 09-25-2015, 01:30 PM
dtec1 dtec1 is offline
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Thanks guys for all the advice i was able to grind down the brick some i just gotta put in the bubble alumina today. I was thinking about changing burners. going to make a new thread i wanna see what everyone thinks and how there burners set up is....
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Old 09-25-2015, 05:14 PM
damon damon is offline
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ive got a slab of that brick in my forge, and its held up just fine so far.....

I know it says its good for 2000, but ive personally seen these things take over 3300 with no ill effect.
granted that was platinum fabrication, and casting work, and not inside a forge.
so far that brick is holding up better than the lining of the forge.

*need to reline my big one and get it ready for winter when ill likely be using it more.
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