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The Newbies Arena Are you new to knife making? Here is all the help you will need.

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Old 11-10-2015, 01:04 PM
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Hunter10139 Hunter10139 is offline
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To hand sand or not to hand sand...

I'm working on a project and I wanted to get some input from everyone here. Would a hand sanded satin finish look better on the bevels with this knife and wood combination or would a 600 grit belt finish look better?

Also, I'm thinking stainless or nickel mosaic pins would provide the best contrast with the wood. The only problem is that I would have to order pins since I don't currently have any stainless ones of the correct size. I do have a brass mosaic pin and a copper/nickel silver mosaic pin available; would either of these work?
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Old 11-10-2015, 01:35 PM
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Ray Rogers Ray Rogers is offline
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I would do the 600 belt first, then follow with some hand sanding and maybe a ScotchBrite pad if you have one.

I think either of the mosaic pins you have on hand could be a nice match and would compliment the handle material. I prefer compliment to contrast in these situations...


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Old 11-10-2015, 05:18 PM
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I've never used a scotch brite pad before. Do you mean the kind you can buy at walmart? If so, what grit do you typically go to before using one?


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Old 11-10-2015, 05:39 PM
Ed of all trade Ed of all trade is offline
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Not sure what Ray means, but I have a scotch brite belt. Have not used it yet but it is said to give a great satin finish. Ed
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Old 11-10-2015, 05:43 PM
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Ray Rogers Ray Rogers is offline
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Yes, a regular ScotchBrite pad that can be found in most any grocery store or hardware store. But, Ed is right...I personally use a ScotchBrite belt and it does create a wonderful satin finish. The belts are expensive though and you would have to order it so I suggested the pad (which I also use when I can't use the belt for some reason). I have tried several 'grits' of the belts and find little difference in them, normally I use the greenish ones ....


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Old 11-10-2015, 07:48 PM
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Well, I get to completely restart this knife.... I was 600 grit grinding the false edge at the top of the blade when I noticed a tiny crack in the false bevel that must have occurred during heat treat. Whats weird is that it occurred inside the steel because I heat treated my knife before grinding the bevels. This has to be the most frustrating issue I've run into in knifemaking.

I obviously can't give this to the customer, can grind the crack out and make something usable for myself? It's a very small crack.


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Old 11-10-2015, 08:12 PM
jmccustomknives jmccustomknives is offline
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Cracks can sometimes occur after heat treat if you grind on one side too long. It can build up stress and cause a crack. I'm not sure I understand the physics behind this but have always made it a practice of keeping my grinds equal.
Then sometimes it's just in the steel to begin with.
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Old 11-10-2015, 08:18 PM
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What steel is it and how do you know what steel it is? The reason I ask is that I once bought some O1 off eBay and made a knife from it. I use O1 all the time and am very familiar with treating it successfully. This particular knife pretty much split right down the middle - it wasn't O1.

I had a similar experience with an S series steel. Followed one of the recommended heat treating procedures shown on the spec sheet and it seemed to work fine. But, over the next 24 hours the blade slowly cracked, again, pretty much lengthwise. A second attempt on another $200 piece of steel worked fine using a more complicated heat treating process shown on the spec sheet.

So, you can possibly regrind to remove that crack and make a usable blade but at this point I wouldn't trust it. You could easily just be putting more work into something you might have to throw away anyway. In a few hours you can make another blade ....


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Old 11-10-2015, 10:57 PM
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It's new jersey steel barons 1084. I quenched in water, which I typically do with no issues, since my bevels aren't ground until after heat treat. The difference this time was that I attempted a clay quench and the clay ended close to where this crack is. I can see where the crack ends, so ill probably grind it out, put a handle on it, and keep it. If it ever breaks, ill know why.


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Old 11-10-2015, 10:59 PM
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I should also mention that this crack is running cross ways to the length of the blade and is about 1/8" long so I think.I can safely grind it out.


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belt, belts, blade, brass, hand, handle, handle material, hardware, heat treat, knife, knifemaking, material, mosaic, ore, pins, problem, project, sand, sanding, satin finish, silver, stainless, store, wood


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