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  #31  
Old 10-16-2015, 12:17 PM
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Ray Rogers Ray Rogers is offline
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Yes, I throw a piece of plastic over my main forge but it doesn't matter much even if I didn't. This is a forge, not some custom car you're building to show off how pretty it is. If it gets hot enough to forge your steel that's ALL that is required of it so stop worrying about how it looks because the looks won't last anyway. A little water won't hurt it.

Some of my forges like the Claiborne forge you saw in the video have been outside for 10 years with snow sitting on them every winter. You saw it running in the video, I did nothing to it except stick a burner on it and it was good to go. It has a paper thin steel shell, 1" of wool with Satanite, and a brick in the bottom. Bugs build nests in it, rain and snow fall on it but none of that matters when that burner lights up ....


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  #32  
Old 10-16-2015, 01:40 PM
dtec1 dtec1 is offline
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Hey ray so i was rummaging through the back yard and sheds for decent size chuucks of steel. i found something that might work i took a pic but can find the wire that goes from camera to computer so...i have absolutely no idea what it is but i found 2 large metal dics they are 11 1/2 in in diameter but i dont know if they are thick enough they are 1 3/4 in thick. is that thick enough if i mount it on a tree truck or concrete? probily not right i know you said some people use a 4 in square but you never said how thick it was. if that wont work i was thinking about this

http://www.ebay.com/itm/INDIANA-FARM...gAAOSw4HVWFEhM

mainly for the price better than anything else but i wanted to know if you look at one side of the top part of rail it looks like a little bit is tearing off will that cause a problem?
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  #33  
Old 10-16-2015, 01:44 PM
dtec1 dtec1 is offline
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alright i thought the water would kinda melt the satinite off and then work on the wool i am the only one that going to see it dont care to much unless the layers actuly peal off and mess with the insulation factor thats what i was worried about dont want to have to re line it every time it rains. but if it works for you for that long in the weather i trust i wont have a serious issue
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  #34  
Old 10-16-2015, 02:32 PM
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Ray Rogers Ray Rogers is offline
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Unless your forge is standing on its end you'd need a hurricane to get much water inside, especially if you covered the doors. Drop the forge in a river, you have a problem but a few drops of rain are nothing.

That rail would work as well as anything else you have access to. If you have an 11" disk that is 1.75" thick then that must weigh 100 lbs or so(at a guess). Probably the wrong shape for an anvil but it could be useful as a base for the rail ...


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  #35  
Old 10-16-2015, 04:09 PM
dtec1 dtec1 is offline
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ok i had no clue as far as the rain and how much. So you think that rail that i included link above in last post is ok i figured as far as the pitting goes and rust easy to grind out even tho one side is kinda sheered half way off seems ok not like it takes a huge chunk out that would change the weight much. i still haven't heard from my brother in law so i don't know whats up with that but that rail on ebay is the only one that is that cheap so i dont want to wait to long and have some one grab it. Today i took a ride too the store with dad to get a part for the ride on mower and around back of the building is a metal fabrication shop so i ran down there and of course it was all closed up and no one there i left a note with my number but he had a bunch of I beams out side there was 2 already cut to a decent length that i could use but the steel wasn't all that thick from what i have seen rails are thicker on top. i am sure i could get one of those for cheap as its already good length take it as is. As i said tho it was thin so i dont know how that will work. but he had all sorts of i beams out there however the bigger and thicker ones were all like 20ft long i am sure he would cut them but i can almost gaurentee that then the price would rise quite a bit. So my question is....is there any rule of thumb on how thick the steel on the i beam should be now i know the bigger heavier and thicker the better i get that but is there a point where it just get too thin for practical use and i would just be better off ordering that rail instead.......i really do not want to waste the money and getting something too small as far as the i beams go and end up spending money on rail anyway
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  #36  
Old 10-16-2015, 04:46 PM
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Ray Rogers Ray Rogers is offline
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If you can make it flex when you hit it with a 4 lb hammer its probably too thin. If you would be afraid to have it support your car while you crawl under it then its too thin. If its 3 ft long but doesn't weigh at least 80 lbs its too thin.

A piece of i-beam like that could make a good base for the rail ...


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  #37  
Old 10-16-2015, 05:16 PM
dtec1 dtec1 is offline
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ok thanks alot ray really you deffinitly saved me from making some costly mistakes i think i am going to try and call my bro-in-law one more time (i dont know whats up he usually calls me back quick) if no go with him then i am going to order one one last question about this i promiss check out the 2 links and let me know what ya think one is $35 5 in tall by 9 in long the other is $55 7 in tall by 8 in long. they both have a lil difference if ya look at the pics. the first one is that one i said looks like the side of it is cracking off a bit but the 2nd one seems to have a lil bit more wear and doesnt look as flat on top (mybe just my eyes) but i also dont know if those differences and also the 5in or 7in makes a big enough difference for the extra 20 bucks

http://www.ebay.com/itm/INDIANA-FARM...gAAOSw4HVWFEhM

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Railroad-tra...WDJZf#shpCntId
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  #38  
Old 10-16-2015, 05:52 PM
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What will matter is how solid and heavy a base you can put under it. Either of those is a good start ...


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  #39  
Old 10-16-2015, 06:07 PM
dtec1 dtec1 is offline
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ok then i think i am going to get the 5 inch tall one its a lil cheaper. and following your advice i think i will use a tree trunk and i have those to metal disc i told you about so if i mount one of them to the tree and the the rail to that...if that works awesome if not ill use your other thing saying the i beam could be a good base....when you threw that idea out there about the i beam underneath the rail you ment having the i beam lay horizontal under the horizontal rail or would the i beam go vertical in that case i would need a couple of i beam sections vertical next to each other to cover the whole of the underneath of the rail. i have read about some people turning the rail on its end and using it vertical but correct me if i am wrong the point of that would just be to give it a more solid stable base wich if i accomplish that with a tree an d that heavy metal disc's i got then there would be no reason to turn it on its end and severely loosing the amount of workable area in the process right? ok either way i am going to go order one of these again ray thanks alot you really saved me some money and taught me some things today as always
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  #40  
Old 10-16-2015, 07:13 PM
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The I-beam would be vertical, one piece, and hopefully long enough to bury at least 1 foot in the ground and still be tall enough to support the rail (horizontal) at a comfortable working height...


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  #41  
Old 10-16-2015, 08:18 PM
dtec1 dtec1 is offline
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So guess what i was literally filling out the thing on ebay to buy a rail and my brother called....he lost his phone but talk about nick of time crazy....he said he will try to get me a piece beginning of next week so thats awesome one less thing i need to spend money on ....hopefully. i think i am going to try the tree base first i figure the more i can work with what i have the better. and i got those 2 discs my father said they are old wheel weights for a tractor. i was thinking about putting the tree truck on bottom maybe put it a foot in the ground then the 2 wheel weights (maybe welded togather or maybe just 1 depends how they sit on each other and the rail and if 1 or 2 would even make a difference at that point) and the rail on top of that. the wheel weights i think the best bet is to bolt them into the tree if i have to ill cut a hole for some bolts. but i dont know how to put the rail ontop of that i saw other rails mounted by either making a couple holes in the bottom part or even just cutting notches and inserting bolts or i could weld the rail to the wheel weight. i dont know yet i guess i gota think about it i would rather not weld the rail just in case anything needs to be moved for some reason. but if there is some significant reason that welding them together would be better than yeh of course ill weld them we will see. i gota see how everything fits together when i get the rail to that might make a difference in the way everything needs to be anchored also
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  #42  
Old 10-16-2015, 08:20 PM
dtec1 dtec1 is offline
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Thanks again ray i spent most of the day inside besides a quick store trip cause i didnt feel great but i still learned alot and ya saved me money i really appreciate it
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  #43  
Old 10-17-2015, 06:38 PM
dtec1 dtec1 is offline
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hey so first off i have to say i need a power hammer or press or well it would be nice. I spent some time today on a billet that i had forge welded a few weeks ago to try my hand at pattern welding. I had put it on the side for a while but got back at it trying to draw it out enough to fold or cut and stack (i dont know yet wich i am going to do) i think i got it thin enough but i stopped there for today ill try and fold/cut forge weld tomorow. I spent alot of effort swinging tho there has got to be a better way besides spending thousands of dollars on a press or power hammer. Ray (since i think you are the only one following this thread still maybe ill make a new thread on this topic) but do you know of another way somewhere between swinging a hammer all day and spending Alot of money on big equipment? or even any tips or tricks that might make the drawing out process a lil quicker or easier. Also i have heard of people freezing a propane tank before but from what i have read it usually because some one is trying to run 2 or more burners from one tank. Well today i noticed that i had the psi reg cranked about halfway up to about 15 psi. I dont have a gauge but estimating i was about halfway and it a 0-30 psi regulator. When it was half way it was fine but i went to turn it up and nothing happened even when i cranked it all the way to 30 the flame was still exactly the same as when it was half way. How ever when i finished and was packing everything up i notice that the tank was very cold and even had some frost on the sides. I cant figure out why i have never had that problem before and everything is the same, same forge , same burner, same tank, even in the exact same spot as before. Is there anything i might of overlooked or something i did to cause this?
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  #44  
Old 10-17-2015, 07:14 PM
Ed of all trade Ed of all trade is offline
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I have been watching, You might check out the appalachan power hammer. Yes I know I can't spell. It is not the best but it is a cheep make. You can get plans on line and they say it works well, I never saw one except on line. Just something to think about. Ed
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  #45  
Old 10-18-2015, 10:31 AM
dtec1 dtec1 is offline
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Hey Ed, thanks
Yeh i did a search and got alot of good info. There are a million different types/styles what ever you want to call it. Definitely something to do research on. The simplest one to build that i found actually uses a sledge hammer (still on the handle and everything) that swings down onto the anvil part. That specific one is a treadle hammer basically just instead of a motor diving it there is a peddle you kick to bring it down. Actually seems like a good idea (besides being simple to build) because you control how hard it hits on each swing by how quick and hard you kick at the peddle instead of having to stop and change motor settings. Either way like i said there is MANY MANY different designs out there need to do some research before jumping into a build. thanks again ed
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