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  #1  
Old 06-30-2010, 11:40 PM
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michael_schaap michael_schaap is offline
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Carbon Knives

So after talking to a bunch of people I'm certainly going with carbon steel for my first and many first attempts. Talking 1095 it looks like from what folks seem to think is forgiving. Ok here is my question though. After it's done and over and you made your knife. How do you take care of it? It's not stainless so it needs a bit more TLC or it will rust.

Basically.... your customer just bought a knife made out of 1095. What do you tell them on how to care for it? If it starts to rust , what do you tell them to do?

Michael

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Should this be in the FAQ?


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What.... just take some metal, grind away anything that does not look like a knife and there you are. Whats the problem now?
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Old 07-01-2010, 07:12 AM
Ed Tipton Ed Tipton is offline
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michael schapp...Yes, knives made from carbon steel will rust.
I always advise my customer that his knife is made from high carbon steel, and that it is subject to rusting. There isn't much that can be done to prevent "flash rust" when out in the field, so I advise them to carry a small piece of Scotchbrite with them. Using a wax or oiling the blade will help, but rust is persistant...and it happens. Storing outside of the sheath, and keeping it oiled when in storage is always advised. Some of the chemecals used in tanning leather will react with the steel if left in contact with the steel over a prolonged period.
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Old 07-01-2010, 09:16 AM
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michael_schaap michael_schaap is offline
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Thanks. Thats the basic kind of thing I'm looking for. I have never had a carbon knife so I have no clue how to take care of it you know. So you DO NOT keep it in the sheath? At face value you know I would think .... then where are you going to store it...?


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What.... just take some metal, grind away anything that does not look like a knife and there you are. Whats the problem now?
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Old 07-01-2010, 09:32 AM
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C Craft C Craft is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by michael_schaap View Post
Thanks. Thats the basic kind of thing I'm looking for. I have never had a carbon knife so I have no clue how to take care of it you know. So you DO NOT keep it in the sheath? At face value you know I would think .... then where are you going to store it...?
I think what he is trying to say is storing it long term. Most follks will advise against long term storage in a leather sheath.

However and I' ll catch flack for this! If the inner leather has been sealed and you make sure the knife is not wet when you sheath it and I usually like to lightly oil the blade slightly before long term storage.

Now that doesn't mean you can store it in a wet enviroment in the sheath. However given the proper percautions before storage I have found rust not a real problem.

You may end up with a slight patina or aging to the blade of a carbon knife but if dried and oiled before storage I don't worry too much about rust.

Another word of caution, the sheath needs to be made of vegtable tanned leather. Never use chromium tanned as it will react against the blade!


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C Craft Customs
With every custom knife I build I try to accomplish three things. I want that knife to look so good you just have to pick it up, feel so good in your hand you can't wait to try it, and once you use it, you never want to put it down !
If I capture those three factors in each knife I build, I am assured the knife will become a piece that is used and treasured by its owner!

C Craft
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Old 07-01-2010, 10:21 AM
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Ray Rogers Ray Rogers is offline
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Carbon knives have been in use for centuries and some of those same knives still survive today. I have several that I've had for 30 to 59 years and have hardly ever done any kind of maintenance on them and they are still just fine.

Ask your customer who is buying a field knife if he owns a carbon pistol or rifle if he's worried about a carbon knife. Why don't they just rust away? Minimal care is all that is required, a little oil or wax once in a while and don't put it away wet. After the knife gets a patina it will be much more difficult for it to rust.

Try 1080 or 1084 for your first few knives rather than 1095. 1095 makes great blades but it is a bit more demanding in the heat treatment than 1080 or 1084 so give yourself a break.

Nothing cuts like a carbon knife!!!


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Last edited by Ray Rogers; 07-01-2010 at 10:23 AM.
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  #6  
Old 07-01-2010, 10:42 AM
Rocket_Jason Rocket_Jason is offline
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I just keep them oiled with a little bit of cooking oil. Wipe it on and then wipe it off. That way if I cut food with one of them I am not eating WD-40. But like Ray said, it's not that big of a deal.

-Jason


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Old 07-01-2010, 10:45 AM
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pipecrafter pipecrafter is offline
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I have a pocket knife that I made several months ago from O1 - an alloy known for susceptibility to rust. However, even my in pocket while working in a hot and humid environment, it hasn't ever developed "rust". It has, however, developed a nice patina that I would expect O1 to get - like when it's given a light etch in FC. I do keep it lightly oiled as well, on the blade as well as the pivot.

I think that if I left it un-oiled and in a humid place, yes it would rust. But as long as I pay attention to it, it's never going to be an issue.

One thing I would suggest is that, if you're going to consider selling carbon steel blades, that you make, use, and test one yourself for some period of time. Even make a simple one and test it to destruction. That way you'll know the limits, as well all the subtle nuances, of your product.


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  #8  
Old 07-01-2010, 09:43 PM
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john smith john smith is offline
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Michael, Listen to what Ray has said. 1095 makes a great knife but for us newbies use a 1075,1080,1084 carbon steel that is a little less tempermental to heat treat and you will come out with a great knife with a great edge.
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  #9  
Old 09-30-2010, 10:48 AM
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ARCustomKnives ARCustomKnives is offline
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I usually rub a light coat of Ballistol on almost all of my knives, stainless or not. Even many of your "so called" stainless steels will rust under the right circumstances.

It might also be noted that typically, the more polished a blade is (or the smoother the finish is), the lest likely it will be to rust as quickly.

As for removing rust, it depends on the amount, as well as the finish of the rusted blade. Sometimes it's as simple as rubbing it off with a pencil eraser. I've also used buffing compound before. Steel wool or Scotch pads work well if you're not worried about scratches. At some metal polish, or some rust cleaner, and it should clean right up.
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  #10  
Old 11-16-2013, 02:35 AM
jerald blaber jerald blaber is offline
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I only make carbon steel knives and tell my customers to use a bit of olive oil on the blade after washing and drying the knife i find that once the patina starts forming the less quickly it rusts
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