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  #31  
Old 02-24-2002, 10:37 AM
Bill Foote
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Re: Has anyone developed a method of stabilizing wood (in ho


After pumping on maple using the MMC and drying, I can put scratches in the wood with mt fingernail. I guess MMC isn't what I'm looking for. It dries quickly and has a brilliant shine with a little buffing.
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  #32  
Old 02-24-2002, 08:27 PM
pupandcat
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Re: Has anyone developed a method of stabilizing wood (in ho


Bill
You might try Gene's formula. I think he is using Minwax Wood hardener.

I bought some and will try it now that i have am jury-rigged vacume pump working.

Gary (pupandcat)
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  #33  
Old 02-25-2002, 09:51 AM
P MOORE
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Re: Has anyone developed a method of stabilizing wood (in ho


Gary: I have been trying the minwax sience the last time I posted it does a great job,but for things like spalling and the likes I don't see it being as hard a surface as I would like to hold everything togther. I gusee we will keep trying. What about the syrofoam (sp) superglue? or just superglue. the secret with superglue as I am told, it hardens in the ABSENCE of oxygen or air. I am sure that this would make a very fine mess:\ oh well keep on trying.
Paul
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  #34  
Old 02-25-2002, 11:18 AM
s mcfall
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Re: Has anyone developed a method of stabilizing wood (in ho


bill, did you also use the benzol peroxide for the activator and heat cure it?..from what curtis wilson say's you have to use that for it to harden...?
stan
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  #35  
Old 02-25-2002, 11:43 AM
pupandcat
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Epoxy?


Paul
For the problem you described, it might work to use slow setting epoxy, heated to thin it. Pore the pre heated epoxy over the preheated wood and container. Pump a vacuum briefly and then apply as high a posative presure as your setup will handle until it cures. (My set up is limited to 110psi posative.)

Would experiment with epoxy viscosity and setting time at elevated temps first.

Just and idea
Pup (Gary)




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  #36  
Old 02-25-2002, 02:28 PM
P MOORE
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Re: Epoxy?


I don't know, Gary;
That whole heated epoxy business sounds like a problem the fumes alone, someone fight find you on the floor. I just did some mahogany in wood hardener and it seems to be fine. Next I have a very nice piece of walnut burl that I am going to do. I have heard and have tried wiping down a handle with several coats of super glue and this does a great finish. on a softer piece I may try wood hardener inside then a super glue glaze when I am finished. what do you think.Paul

By the way, I like your chopper!
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  #37  
Old 02-27-2002, 10:09 AM
s mcfall
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Re: Has anyone developed a method of stabilizing wood (in ho


Funny thing is, Ken McFall of K&G(no relation*darn it*or maybe he would let me in on the way they do it)is on these forums and he is either saying we are way off base or we are getting closer....i dont think he's going to tell us

stan
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  #38  
Old 02-27-2002, 02:22 PM
Geno
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Re: Has anyone developed a method of stabilizing wood (in ho


I have seen varithanes, urothanes, polimers, acrylics, plastics, even bondo fiberglass used to stabilize with.
I have seen colors added, shiny specs added like metalflake added,even stones added in the stabilization stage.
Some agents harden by air, some by heat, and still others by light.
It is more up to the "process", rather than the agent used, to achieve success.
The right agent with the wrong process is just as bad as the right process with the wrong agent, neither works well.
A good process will go farther than trying to find that perfect mixture that works well on everything.
Just about all the info is here, it is just a matter of figuring what works best together for the type of material you are stabilizing.
I don't stabilize ALL my ivory(for example) the same way, because all ivory does not have the same grain pattern and structure, nor does bone, or stag, or wood, ect...
The secret is to fill the voids with your agent, and have it stay there untill it becomes solid,removing all moisture.
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  #39  
Old 01-30-2016, 09:37 AM
ltcray ltcray is offline
 
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Location: America
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Northcoast Supply's Minwax wood hardener instructions

http://northcoastknives.com/northcoa...ints_tips3.htm

I've had some experience (a little...) using Minwax wood hardener. I haven't seen the whitening effect on any of my blocks, but I'm figuring there must have been just enough uncured material left to react to any moisture present. I work with a lot of different plastics in my day job, and acrylic when cured is just about 99.99% impervious to water.
However, Minwax does't like being cured fast. I put a tray on the dash of my old Chevy oven (pickup... you can bake cake in there too), and by the second day I had a pile of hard plastic foam coming out both ends of the wood.
Check out Northcoast's instructions. He does a pretty good job explaining the process.
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  #40  
Old 03-19-2016, 10:20 PM
fish30114 fish30114 is offline
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I learned first by doing pen blanks, and it is pretty common in pen-making, there are several pen supply retailers that sell the kits for stabilizing my favorite vendor is Exoticblanks.com
also it is worth checking out Curtis Seebeck's site, TurnTex.com In short this is a system where you submerge your wood in 'Cactus Juice' pull a vacuum on it, and when it is saturated you pull the wood out, wrap it in foil and bake it at a lowish (250) degree temp. for a couple hours to cure the resin. The results on all the wood I have done, and bone and antler as well have been superb. The stuff is definitely harder after the process. Check out the mesquite mans (Curtis Seebeck) site.
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  #41  
Old 03-29-2016, 12:53 PM
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Chris_Crawford Chris_Crawford is offline
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Join Date: Jun 2002
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I have a tutorial on my website on making a basic vacuum stabilizer based on Jim Hrisoulas' book ?The Complete Bladesmith?. I used it from time to time with good results.


__________________
Chris Crawford


DVDs & Tutorials are available at http://chriscrawfordknives.com
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  #42  
Old 03-30-2016, 11:06 PM
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Naboyle Naboyle is offline
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This thread is 14 years old fellas.
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  #43  
Old 03-31-2016, 09:17 AM
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Chris_Crawford Chris_Crawford is offline
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That's Awesome!
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  #44  
Old 06-20-2016, 02:49 AM
love sites love sites is offline
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Nowadays it is so hard to do this ,my father still do this too.
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