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The Newbies Arena Are you new to knife making? Here is all the help you will need.

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  #1  
Old 10-08-2016, 04:35 PM
dtec1 dtec1 is offline
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416 or 410

Hey guys so I have always used 416 stainless for bolsters (a long time ago I almost got 410 but didn't) but anyway a friend wants a knife with stainless bolsters (both front and rear) so I don't have enough to do it so I was just looking at some various supply sites just to see who has the best price or if anyone got anything on clearance. so I noticed I can get a 6x12x3/16 piece of 410 SS for 20$ or a piece of 416 SS 1x12x3/16 for 14$ so there is deffinitly a significant price difference so it got me thing WHY is there anything about the 410 that its of lesser quality than the 416? again guys I have always used 416 never 410 so there may be some subtle or not so subtle differences that I have no clue about. I would rather get the 410 not only because its cheaper for the amount you get but its one piece that is 6x12 so that may come in mor handy than a 1 in bar if I need a piece bigger than a inch yeh I am sure I can fid 416 wider than a inch but if the 410 cost less and serves the same purpose then why not....any advice would be appreciated
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  #2  
Old 10-08-2016, 05:39 PM
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Ray Rogers Ray Rogers is offline
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For our purposes there isn't much difference between 410 and 416....


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Old 10-08-2016, 06:26 PM
jimmontg jimmontg is online now
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Ray's right, no difference to us, 300 series is fine too for that matter.
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Old 10-08-2016, 09:33 PM
damon damon is offline
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unless engraving, its not going to matter much if using 300 series, or 400 series. you just want to make sure that you use similar pin stock to match.

410, with 416 pins will still blend in cleanly, but using 300 series with 400 series pins youll see the color difference.
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Old 10-09-2016, 08:53 AM
dtec1 dtec1 is offline
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ok thanks guys I had thought the 416 and 410 was pretty similar but with my recent motor blunder (I THOUGHT I was right there too..) I wanted to double check ill probilly use the 410 because its cheaper, better dimensions and I haven't used it so I can see my self how it is...either way THANKS again guys
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Old 10-09-2016, 05:46 PM
jimmontg jimmontg is online now
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Just be sure and check when you buy rod as a lot of suppliers sell 304 or 302 rod. The color difference isn't big, but as Damon said it's there. So watch what you buy for rod if you want a perfect match. BTW you can get 300 series stainless from most any local machine shop in any size you want as well as a few tig welding rods in stainless to match. I'm sure they would give you a decent price especially on the rod. Don't expect to find 400 series rod at a machine shop as I never welded it except for 440C and that's another story for another day. Your mailbox is full Dave. Don't forget to erase the sent box as that;s what I forgot and wondered why my box was full after I erased all the received stuff.
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Old 10-09-2016, 06:53 PM
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My personal experience with 300 series is that the color looks bad, the material is gummy when drilled, sawn, or filed and it can't be hardened like 416 or even 410. The 400 series color is a good match for a stainless blade. Just personal opinion but I think you'll probably reach the same conclusions if you try very much 300 ....


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Old 10-09-2016, 09:34 PM
jimmontg jimmontg is online now
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Right Ray

The 400 hundred series is hardenable and is the only rod I ever used for 440C, but I was warning him to watch out as some suppliers do not sell 400 rod for pins.
I don't make many bolsters unless part of a finger guard and will usually use ni-silver or brass and rod to match, never use stainless for that, for a guard yes, but not a bolster. For some reason I don't use stainless for bolsters, guards and pommels much. Call me a Brass man. Just seems the right thing for a knife to me. Just how I see the world. I miss the Bronze Age I guess.

I have some sterling silver I'm using for some guards, will look nice when I get to them.

Last edited by jimmontg; 10-09-2016 at 09:37 PM.
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Old 10-10-2016, 08:52 AM
dtec1 dtec1 is offline
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thanks guys yeh I have never used the 300 series either its always been 416. I did just order a piece of 410 3/16x6x12 and a piece of 416 that was 1/4x1 1/2x 12 the 416 was only like 3 or 4 bucks cheaper than the 410 even tho the 410 piece has much more material to it. my friend that wants this knife gave me half the $$$ up front since he wants both front and real bolsters and I didn't have the 410/416 to do it and no cash so that why he gave me half up front. you guys seen that polished blue and white dagger that has front and rear bolsters I posted it a while back and its in my album. he wants something similar to that and has been bugging me for a while but now I have a couple other knives almost ready for sale just need sheaths. and he is paying me a decent chunk for it so I figured I would start work on that one. the 416 has always looked good for me so I am hoping the 410 will be the same. Ray ya know I have seen pics where the bolster material just didn't look right didn't match with the blade I thought maybe bad lighting and I guess it could be but it could also be they used a 300 series to. Jim yeh I know you have to keep the rod the same type as the bolster I have never had a problem finding 416 rod most knife supply sites that have steel rod have the 416 and where I got the 410 they also had 410 rod so since I had the money that my buddy gave me I got both the 416 and 410 rod to match the bolster material. I did use 410 rod on a 416 bolster once or twice and it blended seamlessly so I think 410 and 416 are interchangeable. One question you guys mentioned the 410 and 416 are able to be hardened wich I have heard before but never done it. not going to bother on this knife because he probily wont do much with this but hang it on the wall and make it look nice.. BUT would hardening a bolster have any advantages to it? would it strengthen the blade maybe??...JIM I will clear my inbox
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  #10  
Old 10-10-2016, 09:24 AM
damon damon is offline
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hardening the bolster material is not something you usually try to do. usually happens from work hardening, or due to spot welding. if engraving it becomes a problem
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  #11  
Old 10-10-2016, 10:31 AM
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You might harden a bolster if you were concerned about rust resistance. Stainless steel only achieves maximum rust resistance after hardening. I also harden 416 rod for use on my single pin handles as my process requires a very strong pin. 416 is easy to harden, simply heat it to the same temp you use for 440C and then allow it to cool in still air. No tempering is needed since its maximum hardness is well below that of 440C (which is why we don't use 416 for blades) ...


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Old 10-12-2016, 10:11 AM
dtec1 dtec1 is offline
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ray didn't know that hardnening makes the rust resist better...good to know....when you harden the pins you cut them to legth then harden? or say you had a 12in rod would you harden the whole thing
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Old 10-12-2016, 11:36 AM
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I cut the rod to 6" pieces and harden. I cut off what I need for pins with a cut-off wheel ....


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