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The Newbies Arena Are you new to knife making? Here is all the help you will need.

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  #1  
Old 08-26-2016, 04:24 PM
dtec1 dtec1 is offline
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something new (inlay?)

ok guys I want to try something new...I was at a local county fair yesterday and bought a few pieces of stones the guy mainly sells jewelry with this stuff but he had some raw stones I got a few varying in finish level from raw to very polished. so assuming I don't break them getting them to shape (the stuff I got he said can be cut with a diamond wheel on a dremel and sanded to finish) so I want to try and inlay them into a handle I have seen pics of this done (although it is rare) I guess the pics I have seen you don't see any pins or anything like that so are they simply epoxied in or is there some kind of hidden mechanical hold like hidden pins or something like that??
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Old 08-26-2016, 05:02 PM
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Ray Rogers Ray Rogers is offline
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This is me rolling my eyes. If you do literally what you just said you want to do you will be embarking on an entirely new and considerably complex discipline called lapidary. You will need some moderately pricey tools and you will need to learn a whole new skill set.

To answer your questions as asked, you will break them getting them to shape because you have not yet developed the skills nor do you have the proper tools to work stone. Yes, there is a hidden mechanical means of holding the stones and it is called 'setting' the stone. It is a jewelers skill, yet another for you to learn and master.

You could do all that OR you could put the pretty stones in a drawer and forget about them. Go to any knife supply place and buy some recon stone. This is the stone you see me working on the chef's knife video (you know, the DVD that I wonder if you really watched). Recon stone can be easily worked with the tools to already have. Once finished, it looks just like any other stone (because it is, more or less). Recon stone can be set like any other stone, or you could use it on a stick tang or stub tang (as in the video) which eliminates all the issues about settings.

In short, you can do this the hard way and learn a whole new set of skills OR you can spend your time making knives ...


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Old 08-26-2016, 05:33 PM
dtec1 dtec1 is offline
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Ray you forget my head is junked up yes I did watch that video a couple of times but my memory is horrible I forget things that is one reason when I see something done that I haven't tried I try and attempt it right away cause if I don't ill forget what I watched in a week wich is actually why I went back and watched the video more than once. I actuly have 2 pieces of the recon stone but when I saw these I thought it would be a cool idea.... maybe I underestimated how hard it may be for example I have one piece 2in by 2in already polished I thought a diamond wheel on a dremel cut it in half clean up the cut edge and glue and maybe pin it in... I have some large Corby's I was thinking about putting a notch in the side so it would hold the stone tight now admittedly that is all how it would go in my head wether it would work I don't know I was DEFFINITLY not thinking about buying more equipment or spending time learning new skills or really spending any significant time at it at all....I saw these yesterday and thought it would be a cool idea I purposely got the pieces that were no more than 3$ and the 2inx2in one was 5 because I didn't know if I could do it with out breaking them
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Old 08-26-2016, 06:38 PM
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Ray Rogers Ray Rogers is offline
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You've already got one polished? Well then, why not try it? I'd be interested to see how well that goes with a Dremel and a drill. If by some chance it actually works I would really like to know what type of stone that is that you have ....


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Old 08-26-2016, 07:13 PM
dtec1 dtec1 is offline
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yeh a couple are polished but most of them are not in the shape to put on a handle I thought a lil time on the grinder might flatten them out but one piece is already high polish on one side and low polish on the other and I think its the perfect thickness I would have to cut it with the dremmel to get it into 2 pieces the right size. I am not sure what kind of stone it is tomorrow ill take a pic of it maybe you would know. I also got 2 earrings basicly 3/4 x3/4 square but at a closer look the stone itself is EXTREMELY thin and I think its glued onto a plastic backer. the stone is so thin I think trying to do anything to it will crack...ill see if the dremmel with diamond wheel will cut the other one without breaking but if its going to take much more effort than that I think your right just use recon... it is cool looking tho its like green and blues and some gold color in the right light
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Old 08-27-2016, 12:03 AM
jimmontg jimmontg is offline
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I have worked some quartz based stone.

Aluminum oxide (AO) belts will sand quartz like amethyst, what I use and the silicone carbide wet-dry sandpaper will polish out most stones including granite. AO (corundum) is what rubies and sapphire actually is. I use a diamond sharpening stone to touch up my carbide drill bits, but it is a tedious chore. The mohs scale of hardness is what they use to measure hardness of semi-precious stones. A diamond is 10 and sapphire is 9 but it is an exponential bell curve. There is a super diamond called nanocrystalline diamond that's harder.
Fluorite is a beautiful stone, but softer than quartz gems and is softer than ironwood. I collected gemstones btw and did for years and then was ripped off by a "family" member. Turquoise isn't that hard and I recently found out I can cut it with my jeweler's saw. A simple round inlay shouldn't be too hard to do. I've never actually used recon stone except for some malachite on a knife handle. Look up cabochons and how to make them.

Now if you go grinding any type of stone it needs to be kept wet. Go to WebMD and search Silicosis for why.
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Old 08-27-2016, 01:06 AM
Doug Lester Doug Lester is offline
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If you want to get into putting stone inlays into your handles you might just have to bight the bullet and at least invest in some texts on the subject. The Complete Metalsmitm, Professional Edition is a good general reference. It touches on a lot of subjects. I really don't recommend the Student's Edition even though it's a little cheaper.

Doug


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Old 08-30-2016, 08:58 PM
jimmontg jimmontg is offline
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Dtech check out Ebersoles.

Try Ebersole Lapidary on Ebay. They used to have a walk in store near Wichita Ks. I bought a half carat green sapphire there once for $25. Look for the round gemstones that you have a drill size for. Their prices are what jewelers pay. I also bought a beautiful yellow sapphire for $60 too there. All stolen by an accursed family member rotting in the Nether Regions now. Well worth the time to look. Half my old collection came from them.
They have 6" round PSA discs for sanding stone, just keep the stones wet and no airborne dust.

You won't believe their prices.

Last edited by jimmontg; 08-30-2016 at 09:00 PM.
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Old 08-31-2016, 07:31 AM
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Crex Crex is offline
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What Doug said - better read up. Some stones cannot take the abuse a knife handle will experience. Lot of science out there to deal with on cutting/grinding/finishing different stones. Also "wet grinding" is a must if you value your health at all. Would suggest library visit for some "Beginners Lapidary".


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