MEMBER ITEMS FOR SALE
Custom Knives | Other Knives | General Items
-------------------------------------------
New Posts | New PhotosAll Photos



Go Back   The Knife Network Forums : Knife Making Discussions > Custom Knife Discussion Boards > Knife Making Discussions > The Newbies Arena

The Newbies Arena Are you new to knife making? Here is all the help you will need.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #16  
Old 08-22-2016, 10:09 AM
Ray Rogers's Avatar
Ray Rogers Ray Rogers is offline
Founding Member / Moderator
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: Wauconda, WA
Posts: 9,804
No, you don't need to glow.

Drilling before HT is the right way for full tangs. For single pin handles you have to drill post HT ....


__________________

Your question may already have been answered - try the Search button first!






Reply With Quote
  #17  
Old 08-22-2016, 11:16 AM
Naboyle's Avatar
Naboyle Naboyle is offline
Steel Addict
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: New Florence, Pennsylvania.
Posts: 263
I agree, drill before heat treat and you won't have any problems. Not sure why you're worried about carbide wearing out. You can drill a LOT of holes with those if you do it right.
Reply With Quote
  #18  
Old 08-22-2016, 11:27 AM
dtec1 dtec1 is offline
Guru
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: ny
Posts: 1,442
I guess I m not doing it right I got a few of the solid carbide bits and then some of the ones that have a carbide tip brazed on from usaknife maker... maybe 4 blades I can de with each bit...either I am doing something wrong or maybe I am just to hopefull as to how far they should go
Reply With Quote
  #19  
Old 08-22-2016, 12:52 PM
dtec1 dtec1 is offline
Guru
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: ny
Posts: 1,442
any advice on wich ones are better than others or tips on how to make them last longer???
Reply With Quote
  #20  
Old 08-24-2016, 11:39 AM
Naboyle's Avatar
Naboyle Naboyle is offline
Steel Addict
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: New Florence, Pennsylvania.
Posts: 263
Drilling, along with machining is all about speeds and feeds. Bits are made to cut. If you don't have chips or curls coming outta the hole u aren't feeding enough. I run all my bits as slow as I can. Different materials and different sized bits have different speeds and feeds. If u try to run those carbide blazing fast on a drill press I'd imagine that's why they don't last long. My 1/8" has lasted a year or more and is good as day one
Reply With Quote
  #21  
Old 08-24-2016, 11:43 AM
dtec1 dtec1 is offline
Guru
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: ny
Posts: 1,442
alright thanks! the drill press I have is just a lil bench top model I have always just used it as is however I know you can change the speed on it somehow ill have to look at it and try and slow it down
Reply With Quote
  #22  
Old 08-24-2016, 11:08 PM
Naboyle's Avatar
Naboyle Naboyle is offline
Steel Addict
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: New Florence, Pennsylvania.
Posts: 263
Mines a cheap harbor freigh one. Still kinda fast for how I like to drill but good enough. Should be pullies on the top where u change the belts.
Reply With Quote
  #23  
Old 08-25-2016, 02:35 PM
jimmontg jimmontg is offline
Guru
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Location: Now live in Las Cruces NM.
Posts: 1,272
Red face Some basics on carbide drill bits and drilling in general

I almost always drill my hole before HT anyway Dtech. Those carbides are expensive. My most expensive one is a carbide tipped 6.5mm or .255 for quarter inch thong holes. I never use pins that big. Biggest I go on pins is 3/16 loveless bolts. No reason, just my idea of style. I like small pins/screws/rivets. I have 1/8" loveless as well, very nice and fine. I do make mosaics up to 3/16" though using either stainless tubing or brass, but I do prefer the look of small pins. I made a filet knife for my son with 12 pins. (See my wavy knives album.) That was a pain in the rear, but it turned out nice though. I save drilling after HT for guards and bolsters after final grind.

I try to keep it around four to six pins per full tang, but I drill the holes before HT. I also always make the holes in the tang oversize by a few thousandths. For an 1/8" pin I use a #30 or .128 drill bit as it leaves room for some expansion and for the glue to flow. a number 41 drill bit for 3/32 again just a few thousandths bigger. I drill an oversize hole in the wooden tang material as well. You are not going to see the difference between a 3/16 .187 pin and a #12 .189 hole. Makes it easier and a tight pin squeezes all the glue out of the hole.

You don't need a whole number drill set, just the ones you use. Jobber drill bits are a whole lot cheaper than carbide drill bits and less prone to breaking. I know how to sharpen a carbide drill bit and you need diamond to do it so it isn't as bad for me. BTW in stainless slow your drill speed down as slow as you can, especially with carbide and keep it cool and lubed. I use Tap Magic and take small bites, just any old oil isn't the same as a cutting oil. plus it's great on sharpening oil stones and micron sanding belts. Remember you should not try to drill material more than double to triple the diameter of your bit thickness with carbide tipped. A drill press and solid hold down is an absolute necessity. If the part moves the bit breaks.

Just some advice to anybody out there who may not know the ins and outs of drilling, especially stainless. Aluminum the smaller the drill bit the higher the speed, but not with stainless, you will melt your drill bit. Something I did the first week I worked in the metal field. Also the bigger the drill bit the slower the speed. Simple stuff, but maybe somebody doesn't know.

Let me advise you to look up Grainger Industrial supply. They are where everyone of my carbide bits come from. Solid carbide is expensive I have two spade shaped bits a #30 and a #41 clearance for 1/8 and 3/32. Every other one is carbide tipped. Look and see if they have a distribution center near you and if they do you won't have to pay shipping. Dtech, there is no reason why your carbides shouldn't last longer. Look at my advice above. Carbide and stainless means slow rpm drilling speed. Keep that in mind and hardened knives means slow as well. Use Tap Magic and take small bite, then add oil, small bite add oil. Heat is your enemy and carbide chips and breaks easily, be careful.

Last edited by jimmontg; 08-25-2016 at 02:52 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #24  
Old 08-25-2016, 03:05 PM
jimmontg jimmontg is offline
Guru
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Location: Now live in Las Cruces NM.
Posts: 1,272
Dtech, the top pulleys are the fast ones, the bottom pulley is the slow one. Big pulley in front and small in back means slower speed. Just remember that.
I don't have a HF I have a Skil 10" and the slowest speed on the bottom pulley is about 500 RPM. I wished I could afford a 300 rpm model, but it serves as long as I do not ever have to go to a large diameter drill bit. Just cause the chuck takes an half inch bit doesn't mean the motor will. At 500 rpm a 1/2" bit chatters and would never make it through stainless. Oh and don't ever try to drill with an end mill as they are made to cut sideways and would ruin your presses spindle anyway.

Here's a link to a drill conversion table
http://www.csgnetwork.com/drillsizeconvert.html

Last edited by jimmontg; 08-25-2016 at 03:19 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #25  
Old 08-25-2016, 05:20 PM
dtec1 dtec1 is offline
Guru
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: ny
Posts: 1,442
thanks jim yeh it seams I deffinitly need to slow things down ya know I have melted a bit before and just thought maybe to drill pause drill pause and pause more but I am deffinitly going to take a look at the drill press tomorrow and see what I can do to slow it down I have never messed with the speed but I know it does have pulleys I guess to change it ill play with it tomorrow and see happens thanks jim!
Reply With Quote
  #26  
Old 08-25-2016, 08:41 PM
jimmontg jimmontg is offline
Guru
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Location: Now live in Las Cruces NM.
Posts: 1,272
Talking Well good luck

Not meaning to insult you, but read the instructions on your machine,LOL. If you do not have them anymore they are online in PDF form.

And you are welcome. That is what we are here for.
Reply With Quote
  #27  
Old 08-26-2016, 08:18 AM
dtec1 dtec1 is offline
Guru
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: ny
Posts: 1,442
haha yeh your right I guess instructions do help I deffinitly don't have the book but if its a simple pully system I wont have a problem...that's why I love this place sometimes yes its something complicated things or things that just take practice but you guys always point me in the right direction AND more often its something very simple that I over look but one way or another some one explains it without pointing out that something so simple flew right over my head
Reply With Quote
  #28  
Old 08-26-2016, 05:31 PM
jimmontg jimmontg is offline
Guru
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Location: Now live in Las Cruces NM.
Posts: 1,272
Also about those drum sanders. It's ok to use them and fastest speed is what you want with them, BUT do not put too much side pressure on your drum. It may cause the chuck to fall out or worse it can bend your spindle and then you'll need a new press as a cheap HF drill press isn't worth fixing. I hate drilling with a wobbly drill bit.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
440c, bee, blade, blades, brass, cold, drill, edge, fixed blade, forge, grind, harden, heat, knife, make, makers, problem, quenched, rod, solder, stainless, steel, supply, tang, thickness


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Where to acquire end nut/tang nut for Morseth [laminated] threaded blade tang? Naphtali Knife Kits Forum 6 05-04-2013 09:36 PM
Hidden tang mistake Barrett8383 The Newbies Arena 3 12-01-2012 09:10 AM
Large full tang knives.. heat treat the tang or just blade? hawk45 Heat Treating and Metallurgy 8 06-05-2012 09:30 PM
Finishig blade but keeping lines crisp decheman Fit & Finish 1 02-19-2008 05:34 PM
keeping handle lined up with blade Dana Hackney Ed Caffrey's Workshop 6 08-10-2007 01:11 AM


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:34 AM.




KNIFENETWORK.COM
Copyright © 2000
? CKK Industries, Inc. ? All Rights Reserved
Powered by ...

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
The Knife Network : All Rights Reserved