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  #1  
Old 01-27-2008, 10:23 PM
decheman decheman is offline
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DDR3-bl problems

First, when tightening the pivot screw the back side turns, I need to tighten it so the blade does not wobble so badly. I did not get any washers in my kit, des it need it, if so what are the best to use. What is an excellent finish for the scales if planning to make a working knife? The double action spring, can you use it in tandum with the spring?
Frank D.
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  #2  
Old 01-30-2008, 04:15 PM
Whiskers Whiskers is offline
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Frank:

I looked at your post and was not going to answer as I have never made a DDR3 kit my self. But since you didn?t get any answers I thought I could help. First I looked at the picture of the kit at the web site, and it doesn?t show any washers. Then I used the search feature at the top of this site and looked up DDR3 and it looks like the DDR3 does not use washers; some kits don?t need them. I found a lot of post regarding that kit. This one should help.

http://www.knifenetwork.com/forum/sh...highlight=ddr3

Tightening the pivot takes a little work. You need to hold both sides together while you tighten the pivot slowly and center the blade as you work. As you can see you will need three hands. This takes some trail and error to get it right. Once you get it right you may want to use some locktight. Also look at FAQ?s at knife kits page.

The DDR3BL uses a .375 Maxx Torque coil spring. If this spring is used you have an automatic knife and not a double action knife. A leaf spring is for another type of knife that has a backspine with a space cut out for the leaf spring. Automatic knives are a NO-NO in a lot of states so check that out. You didn?t say what kind of scales you have so I am not sure what finish will work best. But if you use the search feature and look around I know you will find one that is right for your application.

Hope this is of some help. Show us how it turned out.

Whiskers
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  #3  
Old 01-30-2008, 06:43 PM
decheman decheman is offline
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Whiskers,
I've done that with the pivot screw but the back side turns and i need to get it about one more turn tighter. My scales are wooden.
Frank
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  #4  
Old 01-30-2008, 10:27 PM
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Osprey Guy Osprey Guy is offline
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Frank-

I need qualify my answer by saying that it's been awhile since I looked at a DDR3-BL. Having said that....

It might not have been immediately obvious, but the pivot that came with your DDR3-BL should have a flat side...sort of a "D" shape. When installed properly, the flat side should mate with a corresponding flat in the hole in the right liner (or it might be in the blade). That flat stops the pivot from spinning.

I vaguely recall reading about a few guys who's pivot didn't have the flat side, and their pivots had to be replaced by Knifekits.

Regarding your wood scales... I always finish my wood with Tung Oil. Sand the wood up through the grits (80, 120 240, 400, 600, 800, etc) to at least 600. Then apply the Tung oil, wiping off any excess. Let dry and then repeat. I always then finish off with buffed Carnauba wax (I have the Beall Buffing System). For over 6 years my EDC has been a EV4N1 folder in a pouch on my belt. The scales are Ironwood and I finished them as I just described. I use that knife every single day and the scales look every bit as good (if not better) than they did 6 years ago.

I discussed this same subject recently over in the "Newbies" forum:
http://www.knifenetwork.com/forum/sh...ad.php?t=45628

Let us know how you're coming along...

Good luck.

Dennis


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Last edited by Osprey Guy; 01-30-2008 at 10:30 PM.
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  #5  
Old 01-30-2008, 11:09 PM
decheman decheman is offline
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Dennis,
Thanks for responding. The pivot does have a flat spot but the liner does not have a flat spot to match, the hole is round. I may have to contact knife kits, the liner may be bad. The missing link to my finish was the Carnauba wax. What and were can I buy a Beall buffing system?
Frank D.
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  #6  
Old 01-30-2008, 11:23 PM
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Osprey Guy Osprey Guy is offline
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Quote:
What and were can I buy a Beall buffing system?
I got mine about 5 or 6 years ago from Woodcraft:
http://woodcraft.com/family.aspx?familyid=2036

Priced at $69 (same price for years), it turned out to be money very well spent. I love the quick change adapter. You can also get it directly from Beall: http://www.bealltool.com/products/


Dennis


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  #7  
Old 01-31-2008, 10:30 AM
decheman decheman is offline
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Dennis,
I ordered the buffing system, thanks for the tip. If you can give some quick tips on buffing? How I have been preping my bolster, blade, etc. is grinding them to shape and then hand sanding to 1200 grit. I then used the diamond rough with a soft buff wheel I purchased from Lowes. It seems to take a long time and still does not come out with what I want. It still seems to have some fine scratches. I've looked at some of the other forum comments concerning buffing and I still can not seem to to get it right. I lightly feed the rough onto the wheel and then lightly run the area I'm tring to buff over it and then feed more rough and buff, etc. I also have purchased some dvds concernig kit making and they all say "now go buff this area" but never show the buffing process.?.?.#@^& Maybe it's just simple to them.
Frank
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  #8  
Old 01-31-2008, 03:41 PM
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El Dorado El Dorado is offline
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I have purchased 4 of these kits and not a single one had the flat on the liners. That sure would have made it much easier to assemble/disassemble. Now I have take most of the lock-tight off the pivot screw, then I assemble the knife on a medium dense piece of rubber (IE: piece of innertube). That will kind of grab the pivet pin"s head and allow you to turn the screw and not turn the pivot pin.
I always thought that the liner should have had a flat, so this was not a problem.

Metal Polishing is a 2 part process, after pre-polish sanding to 1200 grit, the next step is an actual polish using a tripoli compound ( white or green works pretty good) with a hard polishing wheel followed by a good cleaning then a final polish with a rouge compound on a softer wheeel. The tripoli will only remove very fine scratches at best. When you are sanding, each time you change grits, sand 90 degrees to the last grit, you will easily see any previous scratches that need removal. Once you get to 1200 your finish will be a fine satin polish.

The Beal wood buff system is great, but you better have a wood lathe to use it or something more than just a drill. . And, there must be some sort finish on the wood itself because most wood is to soft to take a buffed polish.


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  #9  
Old 01-31-2008, 08:08 PM
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Osprey Guy Osprey Guy is offline
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There's a knifemaker who lives about 3 hrs North of here, who makes a heck of a nice knife. His name is Larry Mensch...and he can get a mirror polsih on his blades that are as good as I've seen. Over the years, I've visited Larry on a number of occasions and he's given me a couple of pointers along the way.

One piece of advice from Larry has always stuck with me.... "You don't use the buffer to remove scratches! You only use it to buff up metal that already has the (visible) scratches sanded out..." And that's the best answer I can give you when it comes to getting a good finish with your buffer.

Do as Steve suggests and change direction with each grit. And make sure you're using a good bright light while sanding so that you can all the more easily spot any scratches you might have missed. I always wear an Optivisor while sanding...so that I can see the scratches. If sanded correcly your metal bolsters, blades, whatever, should buff to a brilliant mirror finish.

Regarding the Beall Buffing System... I use mine with a "converted" benchtop buffer. A number of years ago, when I went looking for an inexpensive, but decent, benchtop grinder (one that could be converted to a buffer), I was lucky enough to find one on clearance at a local woodworkers supply. What was really lucky, and the main reason why I "pulled the trigger" on that particular grinder/buffer, was that it was one of the "slower" speed versions...at just !725 rpms instead of the usual 3450 rpms. If you do a search here you'll find a lot of info on buffers and buffing...and most knifemakers use the slower speed. The main reason is safety...but it's also less aggressive.

The "Quick Change" adapter that comes with the Beall system slips right over the existing arbor, and the buffing wheels can be changed in a few seconds simply by giving them a quick spin off and on.

BTW- Just in case you didn't know this...Don't ever use the same buff on wood that was previously used on metal...and visa versa. You need to always make sure to keep your buffs separate, so that they're not contaminated. I keep each of mine in a large, clear, ziplock-type baggie. And when I'm finished...back in they go.


Dennis


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Last edited by Osprey Guy; 01-31-2008 at 08:18 PM.
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  #10  
Old 02-09-2008, 05:31 PM
decheman decheman is offline
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Dennis,
Thanks for the help, the Beall Buffer works great!!!
Frank
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  #11  
Old 02-20-2008, 07:26 AM
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Andrew Cutt Andrew Cutt is offline
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To tighten the screw close the blade and push the pivot end of the blade tight against the pivot screw with your thumb while tightening, works great for me


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  #12  
Old 02-22-2008, 01:24 PM
Alberto Alberto is offline
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I have built about 20 DDR3BLs,and the pivot must just be held tight with the thumb as Andrew (above )explains.Just a little touch up in the bolster/liner holes to make the button work nice and smooth without "catc up". I also put some molly grease in the moving parts to make the movements nice and smooth!!
Enjoy your kit!!
Albert
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