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  #1  
Old 03-17-2017, 08:04 PM
Rickoo Rickoo is offline
 
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Optimum size wood to stabilize?

So, after many years of woodworking, I've accumulated a bit of exotic and figured wood cut-offs. I'm thinking of sending some off to get stabilized for use as knife scales.

Is there an optimum size I should mill these to prior to stabilizing? Really have no plans for certain size knives.

Is it practical to attempt stabilization on my own? From what I've read, having it professionally done makes the most sense.

Most of what I have is either surfaced 3/4 or 5/4 rough.

Thanks!
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Old 03-17-2017, 08:28 PM
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Ray Rogers Ray Rogers is offline
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Definitely let the pros do it. Google K&G Finishing, Lakeside,AZ and read their requirements for stabilizing. If memory serves, they can handle anything up to 2x2x24" .....


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Old 03-17-2017, 09:17 PM
Bob Hatfield Bob Hatfield is offline
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I use another company for stabilization of my burl wood. They recommend nothing over 2 inches for width and height for best penetration of the stabilization compounds. I did not ask about length of the blocks as I normally cut my blocks to 5 or 5-1/2 inch.


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Old 03-17-2017, 09:26 PM
mr.HC mr.HC is online now
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Rickoo, sounds like those 3/4 could be cut down the middle for 1/4 to 3/8 inch thick scales, by far my favorite size, any thicker and you are doing a lot of sanding to bring them down, and like Bob said 5 inch length is perfect.

Carl
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Old 03-18-2017, 08:45 AM
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Ray Rogers Ray Rogers is offline
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The one thing you don't want to do is cut your scales to finished size before stabilizing. The stabilizing process will often cause a slight warp even in a normal sized handle block so it can really bend a scale sized piece. So, send handle blocks or larger when possible and make them a little bigger than you need just to be safe ...


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Old 03-18-2017, 11:43 AM
Cat skinner Cat skinner is offline
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I hope I'm not highjacking this thread to badly but I have a question. Can anyone tell me why I shouldn't stabilize wood at home. I have been stabilizing wood for predator calls for a year or so now and I'm getting the resin all the way through a 1 1\4" x5" block. I can pull 27 in of vac so the pros won't get much more than that or is it the resin they are using?
I'm not trying to start a fight just curios that's all. I'm satisfied with the results I'm getting so I won't be changing but just curious.
Sam
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Old 03-18-2017, 12:22 PM
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Ray Rogers Ray Rogers is offline
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You can get decent results with some home stabilizing, sometimes even excellent results if you're set up for cactus juice. But, the pro process uses a better resin and 4000 psi of pressure in addition to the vacuum. The vacuum process can get your resin all the way through the wood if the wood is porous enough but the pressure gets the resin inside every cell of the wood. At least, that's how it was explained to me.

For most people, when you look at the time required, the mess, and the cost of doing effective home stabilizing for the amount of wood one maker can use it can be hard to justify the expense. I'd rather send my wood out and put my time and effort into making knives ....


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Old 03-18-2017, 12:45 PM
Rickoo Rickoo is offline
 
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Just what I was looking for. Thanks everyone.
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Old 03-18-2017, 03:58 PM
mr.HC mr.HC is online now
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Thanks for the info about warpage Ray, I did not know that, but good to know as I have some oak from my grandpa cabin which is over a hundred years old which I plan to send out and have stabilized.

Carl
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  #10  
Old 03-18-2017, 04:05 PM
Cat skinner Cat skinner is offline
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Thanks for the info Ray. I didn't know they also used pressure that would definitely make a difference. However I seem to have more time than money and this is a hobby so I'll just keep on the way I'm doing (:
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