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Fit & Finish Fit and Finish = the difference in "good art" and "fine art." Join in, as we discuss the fine art of finish and embellishment.

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  #1  
Old 07-22-2009, 05:44 PM
Pelallito Pelallito is offline
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Cocobolo?

Hello,
I am working on a cocobolo handle and I keep seeing what look like scratches or tears in the wood. I have gone back to 150 grit all the way to 600 a couple of times and they don't go away. Could these be part of the grain of the wood? I have also sealed the wood twice and it is now smooth as can be. I plan to finish with tru oil as soon as I can.
Any advice and suggestions?
The handle is on a EVN4N1.
Thanks.
Fred
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  #2  
Old 07-23-2009, 12:17 AM
FOG2 FOG2 is offline
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It is probably the grain, most Cocobolo has them.Its also a very oily wood so you may have problems with an oil finish drying. I had some that Danish oil didn,t harden on, even after 2weeks it was still tacky.

Most people say you dont need any thing other than a sanded finish on it.
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  #3  
Old 07-23-2009, 08:03 AM
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BarryC BarryC is offline
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I have rubbed a coat of CA glue on it then buffed. It fills the voids and I think that is all the finish you need.


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  #4  
Old 07-23-2009, 08:34 AM
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David Broadwell David Broadwell is offline
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Cocobola has some natural open grain places. It's not as open grained as walnut or oak, but you'll occasionally find some open places. You can probably successfully fill them with CA adhesive if they bother you, but it may not stick well because the wood is so oily.

Cocobola does not need nor will it take a finish. It's just too oily for anything to really penetrate or stick to. The same is true with stabilization. Sand it smooth, at least to 600 grit, then lightly buff or hand polish it. Wax it occasionally with something like Renaissance Wax, but not an old fashioned paste floor wax which will build up and yellow. Cocobola will most likely oxidize with age and use.

I've never been a fan of CA glue finishes. First of all, the stuff is an adhesive, not a finish coating for wood or anything else. Second, it's not really a good adhesive. I don't like the artificial look it gives. If you want to hose your knife's handle with Super Glue and sand it down between coats, go ahead. But I think the look of polished cocobola is much nicer.

David


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  #5  
Old 07-23-2009, 09:29 AM
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I agree. A well-sanded handle of cocobolo with patinate very nicely with use, especially a highly figured piece. I made my father a folding knife with cocobolo handles this past Christmas, and did nothjing but sand to 600-grit and give it a light polish with white diamond followed by a quick carnuba buff. The carnuba will wear off eventually, but evenly, leaving a nice natural wood surface that feels great when you hold it.


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  #6  
Old 07-23-2009, 05:23 PM
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I loved working with Cocobola. I finished it by buffing with pink scratchless. Very easy to work with.


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  #7  
Old 07-23-2009, 07:21 PM
Pelallito Pelallito is offline
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Thanks for all of the replies. I got home and worked on it before turning on the computer and reading your replies.
I sanded it down today and put two coats of tru oil on it. It was a little wet when I put the second coat on! If tomorrow it is not hard or if it looks bad I will sand it down again. I will try the wax. Is the Ren wax available somewhere other then knifemaker suppliers?
I will search for some around me in a minute.
Thanks for all of the help.
Regards,
Fred
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  #8  
Old 07-23-2009, 10:49 PM
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Woodcraft and Rockler both carry Ren Wax.


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  #9  
Old 07-25-2009, 09:32 AM
Pelallito Pelallito is offline
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Thanks pipecrafter. I called around here, south Florida, and no one knew what I was talking about.
Will order immediately. Is the PRELIM worthwhile getting?
A mildly abrasive, creamy paste designed for non-scratch cleaning, stain removal and freshening of many surfaces, especially metals and enamels. In addition it can be used for china, feathering repairs to ceramics, air-brushed glazed surfaces and creates a fantastic "brushed finish" for metals (i.e. knife blades). PRE-LIM produces a brilliant silky, smooth finish.

Its formulation is based on a blend of Neuburg silica chalks in a buffered emulsion of petroleum distillates (white spirit) and water, with emulsifier and thickener. It is "benign," with no notable health hazards and is non-flammable. Protective clothing is not required.

Apply with a soft rag, rubbing gently but effectively; controlled by pressure applied. After a few minutes of air-drying the residual chalky deposit is easily cleaned off with a new soft rag/cloth.

It isn't for wood, but sounds good for the blade.
Beautiful pipes on your site!
Thanks again.
Regards,
Fred

Last edited by Pelallito; 07-25-2009 at 09:38 AM.
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  #10  
Old 07-25-2009, 11:26 AM
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David Broadwell David Broadwell is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pelallito
Thanks pipecrafter. I called around here, south Florida, and no one knew what I was talking about.
Will order immediately. Is the PRELIM worthwhile getting?
A mildly abrasive, creamy paste designed for non-scratch cleaning, stain removal and freshening of many surfaces, especially metals and enamels. In addition it can be used for china, feathering repairs to ceramics, air-brushed glazed surfaces and creates a fantastic "brushed finish" for metals (i.e. knife blades). PRE-LIM produces a brilliant silky, smooth finish.

Its formulation is based on a blend of Neuburg silica chalks in a buffered emulsion of petroleum distillates (white spirit) and water, with emulsifier and thickener. It is "benign," with no notable health hazards and is non-flammable. Protective clothing is not required.

Apply with a soft rag, rubbing gently but effectively; controlled by pressure applied. After a few minutes of air-drying the residual chalky deposit is easily cleaned off with a new soft rag/cloth.

It isn't for wood, but sounds good for the blade.
Beautiful pipes on your site!
Thanks again.
Regards,
Fred
Hi Fred,

I sell the small cans of Renaissance Wax. If you haven't already purchased some, send me an email back channel for prices.

I also sell the Pre-Lim. It's good for some metals such as silver, brass, and nickel silver. I used it to polish the raised portion of the aluminum mirror stems I made for my Harley. That's one in the attached picture. Pre-Lim won't do anything to a stainless knife blade. It's not aggressive enough to really polish hardened stainless. It may remove some oxidation from carbon steel, but I'm not sure. It may work on some dense woods like cocobola or blackwood, but the spirts in it could be absorbed into some woods.

I believe your Tru-Oil was still wet because it won't soak into the oily cocobola. Danish and tung oils would probably do the same. Stick with sanding to a fine grit and giving it a light buffing.

David
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  #11  
Old 07-26-2009, 07:19 AM
Pelallito Pelallito is offline
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David,
Sent e-mail.
Thanks for the reply.
Fred
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