MEMBER ITEMS FOR SALE
Custom Knives | Other Knives | General Items
-------------------------------------------
New Posts | New PhotosAll Photos



Go Back   The Knife Network Forums : Knife Making Discussions > Custom Knife Discussion Boards > Tool Time

Tool Time Let's talk shop. Equipment, Tips & Tricks, Safety issues - Post it here.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 11-03-2004, 03:55 PM
Mr Mike Mr Mike is offline
Steel Addict
 
Join Date: Nov 2002
Location: Mesa, AZ
Posts: 192
Talking Converting A Bandsaw

Gentlemen,

Do any of you have any experience converting an older Delta wood cutting bandsaw to metal cutting?

I would imagine that the blade speed needs to be slowed down considerably, any ideas how that could be accomplished?

I just acquired one of the older heavy duty Delta units, and as I already have a wood cutting bandsaw, I thought I might try to convert this new acquisition to metal cutting one.

Thanks in advance,
-Mr Mike



__________________
"Life should NOT be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in an attractive and well preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways, chocolate in one hand, beer in the other, totally worn out and screaming, "WOO HOO what a ride!"

Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 11-04-2004, 05:58 AM
Tarl_cabot Tarl_cabot is offline
Steel Addict
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Posts: 102
Thumbs up Converting Bandsaw

There was an article in a recent "Machinists Workshop" or one of the other Hobby Metalworking magazines recently on doing exactly that. I have it and will dig through my magazine stack to find the issue for you. Back issues are available I am sure!

Mike Roesch
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 11-04-2004, 07:50 AM
Sweany's Avatar
Sweany Sweany is offline
Hall of Famer
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: Sand Springs OK
Posts: 2,303
Generally they use a jackshaft to slow the speed.

This was on the knifelist
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~
I use what I think of as a compromise bandsaw for wood, micarta and non
ferrous metals. It's an older Rockwell made for wood that I reduced
the
speed on by putting in a jack-shaft to slow it down. I use the skip
tooth
metal cutting blades with eight teeth per inch. Cuts all handle
materials
and brass and nickel silver up to two inches. It has served me well for
over
thirty years set up as described. Granted, it's slower on wood than if
it
ran faster but doesn't have to have drive belts or blades changed for
90% of
what needs cut.
I've got an older bandsaw set up for steel, gear box and all that...
also
one of the flip-flop cheap saws, but it works great. The weak part on
these
is the gear box, be sure to keep it greased and to keep tight all the
stuff
that can come loose. What I've learned about the cheap import lathes,
mills,
saws and drill presses is that they need tender loving care in order to
make
them last. Most of the parts that would be heat treated steel on US
made
machines are cheap and soft castings on the imports. Keep that in mind
and
they will give years of use when not abused.

Wayne Goddard
wgoddard44@comcast.net


__________________
NT Barkin Turtle Tribe ~~~Life is what it is~~~
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 11-04-2004, 04:34 PM
Wulf Wulf is offline
Steel Addict
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: Vermont
Posts: 249
I just slapped a variable speed motor on a Delat 14" last week for that very purpose. Figured I could just switch out blades for whatever job I was doing and slow it way down on metal.

Problem is, I haven't been able to get any 93 1/2" metal cutting blades yet...


__________________
new and improved signature coming soon
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 11-04-2004, 09:47 PM
Mr Mike Mr Mike is offline
Steel Addict
 
Join Date: Nov 2002
Location: Mesa, AZ
Posts: 192
Thanks guys for your reply's, I thought that was what I needed to do (slow it down). There seems to be plenty of room under the saw, between it and the motor, where I can mount one or more "reducers".

Wulf, MSC carried metal cutting blades in ALL lengths, here is a listing of the 93?" blades (also known as 7' 9?" blades):

93?" metal cutting blades

Also, there is a great sort of tutorial on the MSC site on choosing the right blade for the cutting that you'll be doing:

Metal Cutting Blade Tutorial

Thanks again guys for your insight, I'll let you know how it comes out.

-Mr Mike


__________________
"Life should NOT be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in an attractive and well preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways, chocolate in one hand, beer in the other, totally worn out and screaming, "WOO HOO what a ride!"


Last edited by Mr Mike; 12-23-2004 at 08:46 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 11-04-2004, 10:24 PM
Trick Trick is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Shelbyville IL
Posts: 18
Here are some pics of my $10 auction delta. It's a great story (for me ) but I will spare the details right now. I still thank God every time I use it though and love it to death.
Anywho, this ugly old t#rd came rigged up like it is but I swapped out the 1/4 horse motor that was on it for the 50? auction purchased (hey, I dig auctions) 1 1/2hp that is on it now. I do not know what the heck that thing is but have been told that it is a washer machine transmission. The lower off/on switch on the front switches speeds. Really slow and really fast. A couple months ago it started smoking bad. It smoked and only has one speed now, super slow. But I can put my weight into tool steel and can't bog it down much and that is only because I have old crappy blades. So I see no need to do anything about that now. I know that this was on there for decades like this. It wasn't just "rigged" and smoked because it was rigged, just because I left it plugged in and on with the saw off and it got hot. I used it almost a year before it did. You won't be able to use your belt cover. I will rig it variable when I get rich someday, but being poor white trash, it rocks right now the way it is on the cheap. You could probably go to any appliance repair shop and get it cheap or free.



Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 11-04-2004, 10:28 PM
Trick Trick is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Shelbyville IL
Posts: 18
It is hard to tell in the pictures but there are two belts on it and that "tranny" ain't right on top of the motor like it looks. It is a short belt from the trans to the motor, but it is probably a foot above the motor.
Ric
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 11-04-2004, 10:49 PM
Mr Mike Mr Mike is offline
Steel Addict
 
Join Date: Nov 2002
Location: Mesa, AZ
Posts: 192
Thumbs up

Thanks Trick, that's a great looking setup!! I'll have to check out the local washing machine replair places to see if the have any old transmissions laying around.

Unfortuantely for me, I paid just a little more than $10 for the copy of that saw that I got, but I think I still got a great deal!!

I am absolutley in love with both my belt grinders since I converted them to variable speed DC motors, maybe I should do that to this saw?!?!? Couldn't hurt!!

-Mr Mike


__________________
"Life should NOT be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in an attractive and well preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways, chocolate in one hand, beer in the other, totally worn out and screaming, "WOO HOO what a ride!"


Last edited by Mr Mike; 11-04-2004 at 10:54 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 11-05-2004, 07:14 AM
hammerdownnow's Avatar
hammerdownnow hammerdownnow is offline
Hall of Famer
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: Avon Lake, Ohio
Posts: 4,340
Send a message via Yahoo to hammerdownnow
I would first, just put a metal cutting blade on it and try it. I have no trouble cutting thin stuff (1/4" and under) with my wood saw and a metal cutting blade. Took two hours to cut a railroad track the other night on my HF horizontal.


__________________
"Many are chosen, but few are Pict"
"The doer alone, learneth" NT Neo-Devo
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 11-06-2004, 10:31 PM
Mr Mike Mr Mike is offline
Steel Addict
 
Join Date: Nov 2002
Location: Mesa, AZ
Posts: 192
Quote:
Originally Posted by hammerdownnow
I would first, just put a metal cutting blade on it and try it. I have no trouble cutting thin stuff (1/4" and under) with my wood saw and a metal cutting blade. Took two hours to cut a railroad track the other night on my HF horizontal.


Hammerdown,

Well, I tried your suggestion. . . metal screeched, sparks flew and I ruined a new blade. . . wore the teeth down to a nubbin!! :evil

SSsssoooo, I guess I'll wait until the new DC variable speed setup I ordered arrives before I try it again.

No harm, no foul, it had to be tried to know if it would work, now I know!!

-Mr Mike


__________________
"Life should NOT be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in an attractive and well preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways, chocolate in one hand, beer in the other, totally worn out and screaming, "WOO HOO what a ride!"

Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 11-07-2004, 12:32 PM
hammerdownnow's Avatar
hammerdownnow hammerdownnow is offline
Hall of Famer
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: Avon Lake, Ohio
Posts: 4,340
Send a message via Yahoo to hammerdownnow
Doh!

I am so sorry. I looked at your pic of your saw again and ran out and checked mine. I did notice the pulleys on my saw are the same size and the one to one ratio may make the difference. I owe ya one. Sooooo... you could try a pulley swap. On second thought, don't listen to me, and never listen to my electrical advice.

added:but I cannot read the RPM's on my motor. Old saw with no name, ten coats of paint.


__________________
"Many are chosen, but few are Pict"
"The doer alone, learneth" NT Neo-Devo

Last edited by hammerdownnow; 11-07-2004 at 12:39 PM. Reason: add text
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 11-09-2004, 08:23 AM
Tarl_cabot Tarl_cabot is offline
Steel Addict
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Posts: 102
Lightbulb Conversion Article

Go to:

http://www.homeshopmachinist.net

order magazine back issue:

The Home Shop Machinist magazine 2004 Jan-Feb

That is the recent magazine article on converting a wood bandsaw to metal...

Mike
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 11-12-2004, 10:56 AM
Mr Mike Mr Mike is offline
Steel Addict
 
Join Date: Nov 2002
Location: Mesa, AZ
Posts: 192
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tarl_cabot
Go to:
http://www.homeshopmachinist.net
order magazine back issue:
The Home Shop Machinist magazine 2004 Jan-Feb
That is the recent magazine article on converting a wood bandsaw to metal...
Mike
Hey thanks for the information!! I went to the listed website and ordered SEVERAL of their back issues, and will most likely subscribe to them as well. There is some real interesting stuff there!! An EXCELLENT resouce!!

Thanks,
-Mr Mike


__________________
"Life should NOT be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in an attractive and well preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways, chocolate in one hand, beer in the other, totally worn out and screaming, "WOO HOO what a ride!"

Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 12-20-2004, 11:12 PM
Mr Mike Mr Mike is offline
Steel Addict
 
Join Date: Nov 2002
Location: Mesa, AZ
Posts: 192
Bandsaw Conversion - UPDATE

Hi Guys,

I thought I?d offer a follow-up to the ?bandsaw conversion? post I made some weeks ago.

I purchased a 1hp variable speed DC motor in the hopes that it would be sufficient in getting the blade speed down below 200fpm, primarily because I didn?t want to have to mess with jackshafts and extra pulleys and belts. Well, despite my best intentions, it didn?t quite work out the way I wanted, as the slowest I was able to get the blade speed down to just using the DC motor was right at 600fpm, still too fast.

So, the next step was to install a jack shaft and another set of pulleys to slow the thing down even further, and this finally did the trick. Right now, the blade speed is about 80fpm at the very slowest and well over 400fpm at the fastest, more than sufficient for any metal that I?ll need to cut with it.

Below are three photos of the finished project. . . to say that I?m happy with the outcome would be an understatement. I cut out about two dozen blades from both D2 and ATS-34 this past week and it only took me a little over two hours to accomplish that task, where with my previous bandsaw, it took me nearly the entire day, what with the weak motor and the blade constantly jumping off the drive wheels.

Anyway, to the pictures, this first shot is of the speed control box that houses the speed control board, potentiometer, power indicator and power switch.



This next shot is of the rear of the DC motor and the rear of the jackshaft mounting bracket and bearing.



This last shot is of the front of the motor, showing the jackshaft mounting bracket, bearing, and pulley system used to reduce the speed of the blade. I used a 1.750? pulley on the motor that drove an 8? pulley on the jackshaft. Then from the jackshaft I had another 1.750? pulley that then drove a 14? pulley mounted to the main drive shaft.



The pulleys and belts were all purchased from my local Ace Hardware store, making it real easy to experiment with pulley sizes and the resultant belts.

A relatively easy project for anyone willing to tackle it, I highly recommend it, especially if you can find an older Delta bandsaw for a reasonable price like I did. All-in-all I have just a little over $400.00 in the project which includes the original price I paid for the bandsaw ($150.00).

Thanks again to all of you for your suggestions, especially Tarl_cabot for suggesting the Home Shop Machinist website, they were a great resource for projects like this.

-Mr Mike


__________________
"Life should NOT be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in an attractive and well preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways, chocolate in one hand, beer in the other, totally worn out and screaming, "WOO HOO what a ride!"


Last edited by Mr Mike; 09-10-2007 at 04:27 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 12-21-2004, 12:31 PM
fischerknives fischerknives is offline
Enthusiast
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Lithia, FL
Posts: 55
Mr Mike,
Thanks so much for sharing this useful information. I recently did a DC motor conversion to my hand made belt grinder and was considering doing the same with my bandsaw, which is very similar to yours. Your info will save me at least a few headaches - I can do the jackshaft addition and the motor swap at the same time. By the way, nice clean looking job.
Much appreciated!
Fischer
Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
blade, knife, knives


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 11:03 AM.




KNIFENETWORK.COM
Copyright © 2000
? CKK Industries, Inc. ? All Rights Reserved
Powered by ...

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
The Knife Network : All Rights Reserved