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The Newbies Arena Are you new to knife making? Here is all the help you will need.

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  #1  
Old 08-01-2015, 12:09 AM
iamnobody iamnobody is offline
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Join Date: Jul 2015
Location: Indianapolis, IN
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Just set up shop.




Ignore the curtain. that's going byebye very soon.

Still need a chop saw and a table vice, but I got the majority of everything I needed earlier today.


and the design for the first knife I plan to make.


Knife dimensions will be a 3 1/2"L x 1 1/4"W x 1/8" T blade.

7 3/4" over all length.

440C steel with black linen micarta handle.

Ordered enough material from janzsupplyinc to make 3 knives.
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  #2  
Old 08-01-2015, 08:20 AM
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Ray Rogers Ray Rogers is offline
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Good start. A word of advice: you ordered material for three knives. That's fine but make them one at a time start to finish. You're new to this so naturally there will be mistakes or at least things that you would have done differently when you look at the finished item. If you were to try making three at once (and you did not say that was the plan but many do exactly that at first) then you most likely will just replicate your mistakes three times ...


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  #3  
Old 08-03-2015, 08:57 PM
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MVPeterson MVPeterson is offline
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Good advice Ray. I would like to add this: Take your time, don't get in a big hurry. Most of the mistakes I have made were a result of trying to get it done to fast. Good luck!
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  #4  
Old 08-03-2015, 10:58 PM
iamnobody iamnobody is offline
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Thanks for the advice guys.

My plan was to make a few as prototypes. Give them to a couple of friends along with a review card for them to fill out to let me know what I can improve on.

Basics I was looking for were things like Grip comfort, Build strength, functionality, blade symmetry, and overall finish.

Was also going to have them professionally heat treated.
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  #5  
Old 08-04-2015, 02:26 AM
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DanCom DanCom is offline
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Your shop is looking good. I am sure it will grow in time.

Dan
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  #6  
Old 08-04-2015, 06:49 AM
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Crex Crex is offline
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Understand the prototype idea with feedback, but listen to what has been said by Ray and MV. Do one test it, think about what you like and do not like, what difficulties you ran into during the process, and what you can do to improve ...... before starting on the second one. Repeat - again - before going on to #3 and so forth, until you are really comfortable and confident with what you are doing.
You will learn faster, improve your skill and make better knives.


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  #7  
Old 08-04-2015, 08:12 AM
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Ray Rogers Ray Rogers is offline
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Feedback is good when you can get it but I have found that it is remarkably difficult to get on a timely basis. Also, you just gave a knife to a friend so the chances of getting seriously critical feedback is slim. I'd recommend following Crex's suggestion and just do it yourself. No one will be more critical and honest about your knives and how they work than you will and the production/testing cycle will go much faster ...


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  #8  
Old 08-04-2015, 11:51 PM
iamnobody iamnobody is offline
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cool. I'll keep that all in mind and just do one for myself first and see how that goes, before starting on the 2nd one.

would you recommend having them all heat treated at once though? Like work individually on the metal up to that point and stopping, heat treating them all at once and then after getting them all back finish one blade completely to try out.
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  #9  
Old 08-06-2015, 08:18 AM
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It is hard to argue against the cost efficiency of having them heat treated all at once. I would try to do as little work on the blade as possible on the blade before HT but do what ya gotta do ....


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  #10  
Old 08-07-2015, 12:49 AM
iamnobody iamnobody is offline
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Cool thanks.

All the material came in the mail today.

The the pinstock I bought was a little smaller than expected, but other than that everything's good. The bar stock I ordered came strapped to a 1x1 bit of poplar. Think I'll store that and use it for cheap handle material.

Sadly Can't do any work until my next day off. Wife gets a little annoyed when I start using power tools a 3am. Troubles of working closing shift.
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  #11  
Old 08-08-2015, 11:10 PM
iamnobody iamnobody is offline
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Okay about 1/3 of the way through my first blade and here's what I learned.

Metal gets hot... very hot.

pilot holes are very important

always keep a dremel tool with carbide bits handy.

keep all batteries fully charged

invest in a bandsaw/chopsaw/angle grinder something that can cut through steel without overheating.
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  #12  
Old 08-08-2015, 11:24 PM
PoolQs PoolQs is offline
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You learn quickly grasshopper
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  #13  
Old 08-09-2015, 09:20 AM
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Hunter10139 Hunter10139 is offline
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Good learning lessons lol. I highly recommend an angle grinder. It's a cheap and fast way to rough cut out knives from steel.


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  #14  
Old 08-09-2015, 09:52 PM
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MVPeterson MVPeterson is offline
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I agree with Hunter, for cutting steel into basic shape, angle grinder with cut off wheel works good, and is affordable. Yes, the metal gets hot! When the time comes keep that in mind while grinding the pins down to the handle material to avoid burning it. That's one of the many lessons I learned the hard way. Good luck!
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  #15  
Old 08-09-2015, 11:39 PM
iamnobody iamnobody is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MVPeterson View Post
I agree with Hunter, for cutting steel into basic shape, angle grinder with cut off wheel works good, and is affordable. Yes, the metal gets hot! When the time comes keep that in mind while grinding the pins down to the handle material to avoid burning it. That's one of the many lessons I learned the hard way. Good luck!
The first time I burnt my fingers I went and got a dunk bucket. Grind until it's warm then quick dunk to cool it off and continue.

Also picked up some cutoff bits for my dremel tool today. First attempt was with a metal cutting blade on my sawzall. Got 2 blades glowing hot while trying to cut an 8" piece off the barstock. Got the job done, but it wasn't pretty.
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